silversea

LIMA (Callao) Nach USHUAIA

SÜDAMERIKA expeditionskreuzfahrt Silver Cloud Expedition

Gehen Sie über Ihre Grenzen hinaus und erkunden Sie die Welt auf dieser 41-tägigen Abenteuerreise wie nie zuvor. Beginnen Sie Ihre Reise an der Spitze Südamerikas, bevor Sie durch Gletscher- und Fjord-Landschaften fahren. Reisen Sie von der chilenischen Wüste nach Patagonien und entdecken Sie vor der Halbinsel Valdés, eine UNESCO-Weltkulturerbestätte, die eindrucksvollen Säugetiere des Meeres und Magellan-Pinguine. Lernen Sie auf dieser lebensverändernden Reise die Geheimnisse der Antarktis kennen.
Reise C1924

EXKLUSIVE ANGEBOTE / PROGRAMME:

Preisgarantie-Programm: Wenn Sie frühzeitig planen buchen, können Sie auf Anfrage von allen zukünftigen Rabatten profitieren.

Die angegebenen Preise gelten pro Gast

Programmablauf der Kreuzfahrt

Unsere Reisepläne sind einzigartig - nachfolgend finden Sie detaillierte Informationen bezüglich der Anlaufhäfen, Ankunfts- und Abreisezeiten sowie zusätzliche Informationen über die Reiseziele, die Sie besuchen werden.
Klicken Sie hier, um alle Fotos und Videos anzusehen.

When people discuss great South American cities, Lima is often overlooked. But Peru's capital can hold its own against its neighbors. It has an oceanfront setting, colonial-era splendor, sophisticated dining, and nonstop nightlife.It's true that the city—clogged with traffic and choked with fumes—doesn't make a good first impression, especially since the airport is in an industrial neighborhood.

Ansehen 1 Programm(e) an Land in LIMA (Callao)

The port city of Paracas is blessed with magnificent natural beauty and rich historical importance, offerings inviting beaches, ideal weather and pleasant scenery — a combination that draws visitors throughout the year. The shores of the Paracas Peninsula and waters of the bay teem with wildlife and have been declared a national reserve. Condors frequently can be seen gliding on the sea winds or perched on the cliffs; pink flamingos often rest here on their migratory flights.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Arica boasts that it is "the land of the eternal spring," but its temperate climate and beaches are not the only reason to visit this small city. Relax for an hour or two on the Plaza 21 de Mayo. Walk to the pier and watch the pelicans and sea lions trail the fishing boats as the afternoon's catch comes in. Walk to the top of the Morro and imagine battles of days gone by, or wonder at the magnitude of modern shipping as Chilean goods leave the port below by container ship.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Situated between the ocean and the mountains of the Coastal Range is Chile’s largest city of the northern region. Antofagasta's role as port for the exportation of nitrate began in 1866. In 1872, when silver was discovered, the first municipality was established. Today, Antofagasta is still the centre of nitrate and copper mining, as well as an important hub for rail traffic to La Paz, Bolivia, and Salta, Argentina. According to the treaty signed after the War of the Pacific, much of Bolivia's international commerce transits through Antofagasta.
The rugged shores of Isla Pan de Azucar (or Sugarloaf Island) are home to thousands of Humboldt Penguins. The penguins come to this arid island to breed and spend their days fishing, swimming and diving, as do many of the other birds found here. The waters around Isla Pan de Azucar also support Kelp Gulls, Blackish Oystercatchers, Peruvian Boobies, pelicans, sea lions and the reclusive South American marine otter.
The name Coquimbo is derived from a native Diaguita word meaning 'place of calm waters'. In fact, Charles Darwin had noted that the town was 'remarkable for nothing but its extreme quietness'. Since then, Coquimbo has developed into a bustling port and the region's major commercial and industrial centre from which minerals, fish products and fruits are exported. Used during the colonial period as a port for La Serena, Coquimbo attracted attention from English pirates, including Sir Francis Drake, who visited in 1578.

Valparaíso's dramatic topography—45 cerros, or hills, overlooking the ocean—requires the use of winding pathways and wooden ascensores (funiculars) to get up many of the grades. The slopes are covered by candy-color houses—there are almost no apartments in the city—most of which have exteriors of corrugated metal peeled from shipping containers decades ago. Valparaíso has served as Santiago's port for centuries. Before the Panama Canal opened, Valparaíso was the busiest port in South America.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Niebla is a small village on the banks of the Rio Valdivia where Chile’s Corral Bay meets the Pacific Ocean. Today Niebla is a beach resort, but in 1671 it was a defensive fortress built by the order of the Viceroy of Peru to prevent attacks against the town of Valdivia by pirates and corsairs. Niebla is well-known for its lively markets, the remains of the colonial fortress declared a National Monument in 1950 and restored in 1992, and a museum dedicated to its history.
For most of its history, windy Puerto Montt was the end of the line for just about everyone traveling in the Lake District. Now the Carretera Austral carries on southward, but for all intents and purposes Puerto Montt remains the region's last significant outpost, a provincial city that is the hub of local fishing, textile, and tourist activity.Today the city center is full of malls, condos, and office towers—it's the fastest-growing city in Chile—but away from downtown, Puerto Montt consists mainly of low clapboard houses perched above its bay, the Seno de Reloncaví.

Bright, wooden huts teeter on stilts over Castro's estuary waterfront, inviting you into a patchwork of colour that’s sure to brighten any day. These traditional palafitos give the warmest of welcomes, as you prepare to experience Chile at its most vibrant. Castro has faced something of a tumultuous past, having been hit by a by a succession of earthquakes and fires - the most recent a devastating earthquake in 1960. But this city is incredibly resilient, and today the capital of Chiloe Island makes for a fantastic base for exploring the archipelago that surrounds it.  

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Tortel is a commune located in Southern Patagonia, a spectacular wilderness region of rugged mountains, glaciers, rivers and forests of infinite beauty. The uneven geography of Tortel shapes a unique landscape, characterized by an archipelagic area with numerous islands and channels. Tortel is known as the “footbridge city” for the unique beauty of its wooden walkways that connect the piers and houses of this quaint place through bridges and stairs, built from cypress wood, that run for four and a half miles around the cove and that respect the rich vegetation that grows under them.
The English Narrows warrant time spent on the outer decks as the Captain and local Chilean Pilots expertly maneuver through the slalom course of islands and channel markers. The waterway is home to Magellanic Diving Petrels, Steamer Ducks, and the rare endemic Chilean dolphin. This small dolphin is shy of ships and enjoys spending its time in constricted straits with heavy tidal rips such as the English Narrows.
The Pio XI Glacier is classified as a tidewater glacier, which means the river of ice starts in the high mountains and then courses downhill all the way to sea level where it slowly melts into the salty ocean bit-by-bit. The Pio XI Glacier is an offshoot of the South Patagonian Ice Field and approaching from the sea, the ice sprawls out in front of the ship in a wide band that reflects a remarkable shade of brilliant blue.
Winding through the vast expanses of the Chilean Fjords will reveal mountains looming on both sides, waterfalls, and the marvel of hardy flora clinging to barren rocks. Seals and dolphins patrol the length of these uninhabited fjords as they have done for millennia. Small fishing-boats come out of Punta Arenas luring fish and trapping for king crab, while terns dip and glide coaxing their own small fish out of the deep, dark fjord waters amongst tiny islands thick with vegetation.
Impenetrable forests, impassable mountains, and endless fields of ice define Chilean Patagonia, and meant that the region went largely unexplored until the beginning of the 20th century. Located in the southernmost part of the country, this area is still sparsely inhabited, though you will find a few populated places—like the colorful provincial city of Punta Arenas, which looks like it's about to be swept into the Strait of Magellan. Some unique wildlife, particularly colonies of elephant seals and penguins, call this breathtaking topography home.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Puerto Deseado (Port Desire) is a city and fishing port located along the estuary of the Deseado River in the Patagonia region of Argentina. The estuary is a natural reserve and was visited in 1833 by Darwin, who described the area as one of the most secluded places he had ever seen, a “rocky crevice in the wild plain.” Puerto Deseado has a population of 15,000, with an economy based primarily on the fishing and tourism industries. Tourists come to Puerto Deseado mostly to view the estuary’s diverse fauna.
Isla Pinguino (Penguin Island) is a tiny island less than a mile across located off the coastline of Santa Cruz province in Argentina. The island was previously known as an “island of the Kings” for ships traveling on their way to the Magellan Strait; from the 16th to the mid-19th century, sailors and travelers knew this location was a supply point of food. While several bird species live on this island, none are so numerous and distinctive as the southern rockhopper penguins, with their yellow-plumed eyes and squat stature.
Cute penguins waddle and skip in the waves that roll ashore near the sleepy, unspoiled town of Camarones. Life here is lived well and truly in the slow lane, but this fishing village has plenty of joy to offer intrepid visitors. ‘Camarones’ translates as ‘prawns’ and, as the name suggests, this is a great place for seafood – with the octopuses and clams that are scooped from the city's waters proving to be some of the most mouth-wateringly delicious available.
Approaching from Ruta 3, it's hard to believe that the horizon line of buildings perched just beyond the windswept dunes and badlands is the most successful of all coastal Patagonia settlements. But once you get past the outskirts of town and onto the wide coastal road known as the Rambla, the picture begins to change. Ranged along the clear and tranquil Golfo Nuevo are restaurants, cafés, dive shops, and hotels, all busy—but not yet overcrowded—with tourists from around the world.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Glamorous and gritty, Buenos Aires is two cities in one. What makes Argentina's capital so fascinating is its dual heritage—part European, part Latin American. Plaza de Mayo resembles a grand square in Madrid, and the ornate Teatro Colón would not be out of place in Vienna. But you’ll know you’re in South America by the leather shoes for sale on cobbled streets and impromptu parades of triumphant soccer fans. Limited-production wines, juicy steaks, and ice cream in countless flavors are among the old-world imports the city has perfected.

Ansehen 6 Programm(e) an Land in BUENOS AIRES

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Approaching from Ruta 3, it's hard to believe that the horizon line of buildings perched just beyond the windswept dunes and badlands is the most successful of all coastal Patagonia settlements. But once you get past the outskirts of town and onto the wide coastal road known as the Rambla, the picture begins to change. Ranged along the clear and tranquil Golfo Nuevo are restaurants, cafés, dive shops, and hotels, all busy—but not yet overcrowded—with tourists from around the world.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
The remarkable beauty of the remote Falkland Islands can best be seen on New Island. The westernmost of the inhabited islands of the archipelago, it is a wildlife and nature reserve, and an environmental conservation group protects its many birds and animals. There are rookeries where Rockhopper Penguins and Blue-eyed Shags share the same nesting area. Black-browed Albatrosses can be seen going about their daily routines and it is easy to spot Upland Geese. More than 40 species of birds breed on the island.
Located slightly northwest of West Falkland, West Point Island is used for sheep farming and nature observations. Peale’s dolphins and the distinctive black and white markings of the Commerson’s dolphin can usually be seen in the waters around West Point Island. Rolling moorland and steep cliffs make for great photographic opportunities, but the main attraction is the Devil’s Nose, a cliffside colony of Black-browed Albatrosses nesting side-by-side with feisty Rockhopper Penguins. Magellanic Penguins and Magellanic Cormorants can also be found on the island.
Tiny Stanley, capital of the Falklands, seems in many ways like a British village fallen out of the sky. Many homes are painted in bright colours, adding visual appeal to this distant outpost. Not far offshore, the wreck of the Lady Elizabeth, is one of the many vessels remaining as a silent testimonial to the region's frequent harsh weather conditions. The islands, also known by their Spanish name of Islas Malvinas, are home to arguably more tuxedo-clad inhabitants of the penguin variety than human residents.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Awesome glaciers flecked with pink algae can be seen approaching Elephant Island — so named either for its elephant-like appearance or for sightings of elephant seals here. Elephant Island is home to several Chinstrap Penguin rookeries, as well as 2,000-year-old moss colonies. Weddell seals and Macaroni Penguins can also be spotted. In 1916, when Ernest Shackleton’s ship Endurance was crushed in pack ice in the Weddell Sea, the crew was stranded here for more than 4 months finding shelter under two upturned lifeboats on the spit of land Shackleton’s men named ‘Point Wild’.
The Antarctic Sound is a stretch of water named after the first ship to have passed through this body of water from the Bransfield Strait to the Weddell Sea in 1902. The Antarctic eventually sank and crew and scientists had to spend quite some time in this area before they could be rescued. Sites that have to do with this story - like Hope Bay or Paulet Island - are sometimes visited. At Paulet, Hope Bay and Brown Bluff Adelie and Gentoo Penguins breed, as do Kelp Gulls and Cape Petrels, Snow Petrels and Skuas.
Remote and otherworldly, Antarctica is irresistible for its spectacular iceberg sculptures and calving glaciers, and for the possibility of up-close encounters with marine mammals and the iconic penguins. The Antarctic Peninsula – the main peninsula closest to South America – has a human history of almost 200 years, with explorers, sealers, whalers, and scientists who have come to work, and eventually intrepid visitors coming to enjoy this pristine and remote wilderness.
Some 770 kilometers (478 miles) south of Cape Horn, the South Shetland Islands are usually the first land seen in Antarctica. Separated from the Antarctic Peninsula by the Bransfield Strait, nine major islands make up the group. The region was the first to be exploited by sealers in the early 19th century, and because of its proximity to South America, it still is the most visited by scientists and tourists. Chinstrap, Adelie, Gentoo and Macaroni Penguins all breed here.
The Drake Passage has a notorious reputation for its turbulent seas due to the westerly winds and the funneling effect of the passage. The Antarctic Convergence, a natural boundary where cold polar water flows northward and warmer equatorial water moves southward, is within the Drake Passage. When these two currents meet, nutrients are pushed to the surface, often attracting a multitude of seabirds and whales. Black-browed Albatross, Sooty Shearwaters and White-chinned Petrels glide in the air currents alongside and in the wake of the ship.
At 55 degrees latitude south, Ushuaia (pronounced oo-swy-ah) is closer to the South Pole than to Argentina's northern border with Bolivia. It is the capital and tourism base for Tierra del Fuego, the island at the southernmost tip of Argentina.Although its stark physical beauty is striking, Tierra del Fuego's historical allure is based more on its mythical past than on rugged reality. The island was inhabited for 6,000 years by Yámana, Haush, Selk'nam, and Alakaluf Indians.

Ansehen 3 Programm(e) an Land in USHUAIA

WÄHLEN SIE IHRE SUITE UND FORDERN SIE IHR ANGEBOT AN

Owner's Suite

Bis zu 827 ft² / 77 m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 64.900
Grand Suite

Bis zu 1,314 ft² / 122 m²mit Veranda

Von US$ 56.500
Royal Suite

Bis zu 1,031 ft² / 96m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 53.900
Silver Suite

541 ft² / 52 m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 51.300
Medallion Suite

437 ft² / 40.6 m² mit veranda

Von US$ 46.000
Deluxe Veranda Suite

295 ft² / 27 m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 28.000
Veranda Suite

295 ft² / 27 m² mit veranda

Von US$ 26.800
Vista Suite

240 ft² / 22m²

Von US$ 21.500
Die angegebenen Preise gelten pro Gast

Silver Cloud Expedition

Nach Abschluss der umfangreichen Modernisierungsarbeiten ist die Silver Cloud das wohl geräumigste und komfortabelste Expeditions-Kreuzfahrtschiff mit Eisklasse sein. Die grossen Suiten, einzigartigen Reiserouten und ein beispielloser Service an Bord zeichnen dieses Meisterwerk des Schiffsbau aus. 4 Restaurants verwöhnen Sie mit einem vielfältigen kulinarischen Angebot. Zudem verfügen die meisten Suiten über eine private Veranda, von der Sie in aller Ruhe Wale oder Pinguine beobachten können. Grosszügig geschnittene Decks mit zahlreichen Freiluftbereichen und einem Swimmingpool machen eine Expedition an Bord der „neuen“ Silver Cloud zu einem unvergesslichen Erlebnis. Dank der geringen Anzahl an Gästen, bietet die Silver Cloud das grösstmögliche Platzangebot pro Gast sowie das höchste Gäste-Crew-Verhältnis auf Expeditionsschiffen. 16 hochmoderne Zodiacs® ermöglichen gleichzeitige Erkundungen mit allen Gästen an Bord. Schliesslich begleitet Sie ein Team aus 19 leidenschaftlichen Experten, die dafür sorgen, dass Ihre Kreuzfahrt zu einem besonders spannenden und informativen Ereignis wird.

Suiten

Silverseas Suiten mit Meeresblick gehören zu den geräumigsten der Kreuzschifffahrt schlechthin und beinhalten alle den Service eines Butlers. Wählen Sie Ihre Suite und fordern Sie ein Angebot an - Gäste, die früh buchen, werden mit den besten Preisen und der Möglichkeit, ihre Suite zu wählen, belohnt.

Suiten

Silverseas Suiten mit Meeresblick gehören zu den geräumigsten der Kreuzschifffahrt schlechthin und beinhalten alle den Service eines Butlers. Wählen Sie Ihre Suite und fordern Sie ein Angebot an - Gäste, die früh buchen, werden mit den besten Preisen und der Möglichkeit, ihre Suite zu wählen, belohnt.

Owner's Suite

Bis zu 827 ft² / 77 m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 64.900
Grand Suite

Bis zu 1,314 ft² / 122 m²mit Veranda

Von US$ 56.500
Royal Suite

Bis zu 1,031 ft² / 96m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 53.900
Silver Suite

541 ft² / 52 m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 51.300
Medallion Suite

437 ft² / 40.6 m² mit veranda

Von US$ 46.000
Deluxe Veranda Suite

295 ft² / 27 m² mit Veranda

Von US$ 28.000
Veranda Suite

295 ft² / 27 m² mit veranda

Von US$ 26.800
Vista Suite

240 ft² / 22m²

Von US$ 21.500
Die angegebenen Preise gelten pro Gast

Restaurants

Entdecken Sie unsere zahlreichen Treffpunkte an Bord, wo Sie Zeit mit gleichgesinnten Reisenden und natürlich unseren personalisierten All-inclusive-Service genießen können.

Öffentliche Bereiche

Bekannt für kulinarische Exzellenz und innovativen Geist, bieten Silversea Luxus-Kreuzfahrten eine Auswahl an offenen Restaurants Restaurants in der gesamte, sowie mehrere Spezialitäten Veranstaltungsorte an Bord aller Nicht-Expedition Schiffe.

10 Landprogramme und 7 Hotels

Unsere Landprogramme (mehrtägig während, vor oder nach der Kreuzfahrt) bieten zusätzliche Möglichkeiten, um mehr von den Highlights und verborgenen Schätzen der Länder, die Sie besuchen, zu entdecken.

Restaurants & öffentliche Bereiche

Sie werden sich an Bord nicht langweilen. Entdecken Sie vielfältige Speiseoptionen, lassen Sie sich mit kulinarischer Exzellenz verwöhnen und lernen Sie internationale Touristen an aufregenden Treffpunkten kennen, während Sie unseren All-inclusive-Lifestyle genießen.