silversea

Reykjavik To St John's, Newfoundland

ARCTIC AND GREENLAND expedition cruise Silver Explorer

Follow in the footsteps of the early Norse exploration of Greenland and Canada and go beyond your boundaries in a region that is unparalleled in bucolic loveliness. From the outstanding pieces of Inuit art in Qaqortoq, Nuuk and Iqaluit to small fishing communities of Aappilattoq to relaxing in hot springs as icebergs float by, this is a journey of warm welcomes, chilly waters and pristine scenery.
Voyage 7918

Book and pay in full by 30 June, 2018 and save 10%*

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Cruise itinerary

Our itineraries are second-to-none – below please find detailed information regarding ports of call, arrival and departure times, as well as supplemental information about the destinations you’ll visit
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Sprawling Reykjavík, the nation's nerve center and government seat, is home to half the island's population. On a bay overlooked by proud Mt. Esja (pronounced eh-shyuh), with its ever-changing hues, Reykjavík presents a colorful sight, its concrete houses painted in light colors and topped by vibrant red, blue, and green roofs. In contrast to the almost treeless countryside, Reykjavík has many tall, native birches, rowans, and willows, as well as imported aspen, pines, and spruces.Reykjavík's name comes from the Icelandic words for smoke, reykur, and bay, vík.

View 1 Land programme(s) in Reykjavik

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Located on Greenland’s relatively rarely visited rugged east coast, Skoldungen Fjord has enchanting scenery with towering mountains tipped with snow, ice-scraped valley sides and sculptured icebergs in shades of white and blue. At the top of the fjord one can easily see the retreating state of the Thrym Glacier. The U-shaped fjord offers spectacular scenery and as an extra perk, it is not uncommon to see whales in the fjord.
Connecting the Denmark Strait with Davis Strait, Prins Christian Sund offers a protected course from southeastern to southwestern Greenland, and is one of South Greenland’s most dramatic natural features. The water is generally placid and the crisp scent of ice fills the air. On either side of the Sund, waterfalls stream down sharp, wrinkled mountainsides. Depending on weather conditions, icebergs that glitter in the sun may be constant companions during the passage.
Aapilattoq is a small settlement near the western end of Prins Christian Sund in southwestern Greenland. In the local Greenlandic language the name means, "sea anemone". This small village of 130 inhabitants, hidden behind a prominent rock, offers a good insight into the life of Greenlandic Inuit. A stroll through the village will reveal a small school and a church, along with the likely possibility of seeing a polar bear skin drying in the wind behind a local dwelling. People have lived off the land in the area around Aapilattoq since the 19th century.
Nanortalik lies in a scenic area surrounded by steep mountainsides and is Greenland’s tenth-largest and most southerly town with less than 1500 inhabitants. The town’s name means the “place of polar bears”, which refers to the polar bears that used to be seen floating offshore on summer’s ice floes. Nanortalik has an excellent open-air museum that gives a broad picture of the region from Inuit times to today. Part of the exhibition is a summer hunting camp, where Inuit in traditional clothing describe aspects of their ancestor’s customs and lifestyle.

Uunartoq is a small island in South Greenland a short distance east of what once was considered the largest settlement in Greenland. The island has hot springs that were renowned as far back as the days of the Norse for their healing effects. Three naturally heated streams have been channeled to flow into a knee-deep and stone-lined pool. While one unwinds by soaking in the steaming waters, one can watch icebergs that either clog the fjord to the north or come floating by.
The largest town in southern Greenland, Qaqortoq has been inhabited since prehistoric times. Upon arrival in this charming southern Greenland enclave, it's easy to see why. Qaqortoq rises quite steeply over the fjord system around the city, offering breath-taking panoramic vistas of the surrounding mountains, deep, blue sea, Lake Tasersuag, icebergs in the bay, and pastoral backcountry.

Northeast of Qaqortoq and at the end of a fjord, Hvalsey is one of the best examples of South Greenland’s many scattered ruins from the Norse period. Today the area is used for sheep-grazing, but until the 15th century the settlement at Hvalsey, and specifically Hvalsey’s church, played an important part. Christianity had spread its influence throughout Europe and eventually had reached remote Greenland, where it established itself in the country in 1000 AD. Hvalsey Church was built in the 14th century and is the best preserved of the churches in Greenland from that period.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Nuuk, meaning “the cape”, was Greenland’s first town (1728). Started as a fort and later mission and trading post some 240 kilometers south of the Arctic Circle, it is the current capital. Almost 30% of Greenland’s population lives in the town. Not only does Nuuk have great natural beauty in its vicinity, but there are Inuit ruins, Hans Egede’s home, the parliament, and the Church of our Saviour as well. The Greenlandic National Museum has an outstanding collection of Greenlandic traditional dresses, as well as the famous Qilakitsoq mummies.

Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Iqaluit is the capital of Canada’s newest territory, Nunavut, which is Inuktitut for “our land”. The community is located at the head of Frobisher Bay, an inlet of the North Atlantic extending into southeastern Baffin Island. The Bay is so long that it was first taken to be the possible entrance of a Northwest Passage. In Iqaluit, the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum and the Nunavut Legislative Assembly Building both house incredible collections of Inuit artwork with interesting local prints for sale in the museum shop.
Monumental Island in Davis Strait was named by Arctic explorer Charles Francis Hall as a tribute to the memory of Sir John Franklin who died in his quest to find the Northwest Passage. The island is offshore of Baffin Island in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago of the territory of Nunavut. Around the shoreline scores of Black Guillemots dive and fish for little Arctic cods and capelins. Successful birds fly off with a minnow grasped tightly in their beaks. On a far larger scale, it is possible to find groups of walruses with their impressive tusks along the shores of the island.
Named in honour of Sir John Franklin’s widow, the lonely and uninhabited Lady Franklin Island lies off of Baffin Island’s Hall Peninsula at the entrance to Cumberland Sound. The island is named for the wife of Sir John Franklin, the Arctic explorer who died trying to discover the Northwest Passage. The geology of the island is striking with vertical cliffs of Archean rocks, likely to be some of the oldest stone in Canada. The waters around Lady Franklin Island offer an abundance seabirds, ducks, seals, and walrus.
Days at sea are the perfect opportunity to relax, unwind and catch up with what you’ve been meaning to do. So whether that is whale watching from the Observatory Lounge, writing home to your loved ones or simply topping up your tan by the pool, these blue sea days are the perfect balance to busy days spent exploring shore side.
Around the year 1000, Vikings from Greenland and Iceland founded the first European settlement in North America, near the northern tip of Newfoundland. They arrived in the New World 500 years before Columbus but stayed only a few years and were forgotten for centuries. Since the settlement's rediscovery in the last century, the archaeological site has brought tourism to the area. Viking themes abound but so do views, whales, icebergs, fun dining experiences, and outdoor activities.

Twillingate is the self-proclaimed ‘Iceberg Capital of the World’, although icebergs will be a more likely occurrence in the winter months. The community is home to the “Prime Berth Museum”, which is best described as a commercial fishing heritage site highlighting the glory “salt fish days” before the cod fishery moratorium in the mid-1980s. Several historic buildings packed with artifacts are located near the shoreline, in addition to an impressive skeleton of a Sei whale and the two giant racks of its baleen on display.
Old meets new in the province's capital (metro-area population a little more than 200,000), with modern office buildings surrounded by heritage shops and colorful row houses. St. John's mixes English and Irish influences, Victorian architecture and modern convenience, and traditional music and rock and roll into a heady brew. The arts scene is lively, but overall the city moves at a relaxed pace. For centuries, Newfoundland was the largest supplier of salt cod in the world, and St. John's Harbour was the center of the trade.

SELECT YOUR SUITE AND REQUEST A QUOTE

Owner's Suite

728 ft² / 67m² including private balcony

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Grand Suite

618 ft² / 57m² including a private balcony

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Silver Suite

422 ft² / 39m² including 2 French balconies

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Medallion Suite

400 ft² / 37m² including a private balcony

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Veranda Suite

206-216 ft² / 19-20m² including a French balcony

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Vista Suite

192 ft² / 18m² with large picture window

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View Suite

192 ft² / 18m² with view window

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Explorer Suite

175-190 ft² / 16-18m² with view window

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Adventurer Suite

157-167 ft²/14-15 m² with 2 portholes

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Fares shown are per guest

included in the cruise fare

  • Personalised service – the best crew-to-guest ratio in expedition cruising
  • Butler service in every suite and stateroom – all guests are pampered equally
  • Open-seating dining options – dine when and with whomever you please
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship – select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees and soft drinks, plus your own tailored mini-bar
  • In-suite dining and room service – available 24 hours aboard Silver Explorer, and from 06:00 to 23:00 aboard Silver Galapagos and Silver Discoverer
  • Enrichment lectures by a highly qualified Expeditions Team
  • Guided Zodiac, land and sea tours, and shoreside activities led by the Expeditions Team
  • Gratuities always included in your fare
  • Unlimited Free Wifi
  • Complimentary Parka
  • *Excluding All Full World Cruise and Grand Voyages

Silver Explorer

Silversea’s purpose-built luxury Silver Explorer expedition cruise ship has been designed specifically for navigating waters in some of the world’s most remote destinations, including both of earth’s polar regions.  A strengthened hull with a Lloyd’s Register ice-class notation (1A) for passenger vessels enables the Silver Explorer Expedition Cruise Ship to safely push through ice floes with ease. A fleet of 12 Zodiac boats allows Silversea Expedition guests to visit even the most off-the-beaten path locations and an expert Expedition Team provides insight and understanding to each unforgettable Silver Explorer luxury cruise adventure. 

Suites

Silversea's oceanview suites are some of the most spacious in cruising, and all include the services of a butler. Select your suite and Request a Quote - guests who book early are rewarded with the best fares and ability to select their desired suite.

Restaurants

Discover our collection of onboard venues where you'll enjoy spending time with like-minded travellers and of course, our personalized all-inclusive service.

Public Areas

Renowned for culinary excellence and innovative spirit, Silversea's luxury cruises offer a choice of open-seating dining options throughout the fleet, as well as several specialty venues aboard all non-expedition ships.

1 Land programme and 2 Hotels

Our land programmes (multi-day mid-, pre- or post-cruise) provide additional opportunities to discover more of the highlights and hidden treasures of the lands you visit.

Your expedition will lead to one discovery after another. A complimentary programme of unique, small-group shore experiences, led by team of expert guides and lectures, allows you to fully experience the lands you'll visit.

voyage highlights

Join us for a journey to follow the route of the Norse in they explored the rugged coasts of Iceland, Greenland and North America. Heading first to East Greenland, we will experience the beauty of fjords, glaciers and icebergs. In South and West Greenland, we will see the remains of Norse settlements and visit small towns and villages to encounter this fascinating mix of local and Danish culture. Visit L’Anse aux Meadows (UNESCO World Heritage Site) to see first-hand how far to the south the Norse journeyed and eventually settled. Enjoy examples of Inuit art and learn about the traditions they still follow today. Look for walrus, polar bears, humpbacks, Minke whales and orcas as we cruise by Zodiac and aboard the Silver Explorer. Throughout the voyage, learn about the history, geology, wildlife and botany of this spectacular area from lecture presentations offered by your knowledgeable on board Expedition Team.

Voyage Highlights:

Skjoldungen Fjord, Greenland –

Skjoldungen, a large uninhabited island off of Greenland’s east coast offers a spectacular ship’s cruise and (weather permitting) a Zodiac cruise to approach Thrym Glacier. Keep an eye out for whales, which are often spotted at the entrance to Skjoldungen. The island was named after Sjoldr, one of the first legendary Danish kings mentioned in the Old English poem Beowulf.

Prince Christian Sound, Greenland –
The Silver Explorer will cruise through the Prince Christian Sound (Prins Christian Sund), the waterway connecting the east and west coasts of Greenland. Spend several enthralled hours as we pass through one of Greenland’s most dramatic natural features, with steep mountains, waterfalls and glaciers.

Uunartoq Island, Greenland –
Uunartoq is Greenlandic for “The Warming Island” for its hot springs, though this region only became in island in 2005, when the ice shelves locally began to retreat rapidly. The contrast of icebergs and hot springs is truly a bold one!

Qaqortoq, Greenland –
Stroll through the picturesque harbour town of Qaqortoq, its colorful houses painted in bright primary shades. The modest Qaqortoq Museum houses a unique collection of contemporary artwork, and a superb collection of Inuit artifacts associated with hunting and fishing. The town is also famous for “Stone and Man,” an open-air sculpture gallery consisting of rock carvings and etchings.

Hvalsey, Greenland –
Visit Hvalsey, which is Greenlandic for Whale Island, which according to the Icelandic Book of Settlements was established by Erik the Red’s uncle in the late 10th century. Go ashore and find the best-preserved ruins of a Norse church dating back to the 1300s.

Nuuk, Greenland –
Our leisurely walk through the historic part of this picturesque harbor town allows us to take in Nuuk’s natural beauty, and also to see Inuit ruins, Hans Egede’s home, parliament, and the Church of our Saviour. View the famous Qilakitsoq mummies and traditional clothing and artifacts at the Greenlandic National Museum.

Iqaluit, Nunavut, Canada –
Visit the capital (and only city) of the Canadian Arctic territory Nunuvut where exceptional artwork is featured in the Nunatta Sunakkutaangit Museum. Indigenous artwork plays an important role in the city as it is displayed in the Nunavut Legislative Assemble Building, and even in the streets, which are covered in colorful Inuit murals.

Monumental Island, Nunavut, Canada –
Monumental Island was named by Arctic explorer Charles Francis Hall in tribute to Sir John Franklin, an English Royal Navy officer and explorer of the Arctic who died in his quest to find the Northwest Passage. Cruise by Zodiac, if the weather permits, to look for walrus, polar bears, and Black Guillemots diving as they fish along the shoreline.

L’Anse aux Meadows, Newfoundland, Canada –
Visit an incredible UNESCO World Heritage Site – L’Anse aux Meadows – the first European settlement in North America. Discovered in 1960, the archaeological site is believed to be established by either Vikings or the Norse around 1000 AD as evidence of pre-Columbian overseas contact. Three buildings have been reconstructed near the original site so visitors can witness the lifestyles of these hardy explorers.

Cultural Highlights:

• Retrace the route taken by the Norse and see the remains of Norse manors and churches in Greenland and Canada.
• Visit a small village in Southwest Greenland to see how the Inuit live.
• Learn about the different cultures that have lived in Greenland and Nunavut at the Greenlandic National Museum in Nuuk and Iqaluit’s visitors center.
• See outstanding examples of Inuit art in Qaqortoq, Nuuk (Greenland) and Iqaluit (Nunavut, Canada).

Wildlife Watch List:

• Humpback whales, minke whales, fin whales and orcas
• Polar bear (Monumental and Lady Franklin Islands), walrus and seals
• Seabirds of note: Black-legged Kittiwakes, Northern Fulmars, Great Shearwater, Great Skua, Great Cormorant, Black Guillemot, Common Guillemot and Brünnich’s Guillemot, Glaucous Gull, and Great Black-backed Gull
 

Please note: Expedition highlights and wildlife listed here are possible experiences only and cannot be guaranteed. Your Expedition Leader and Captain will work together to ensure opportunities for adventure and exploration are the best possible, taking into account the prevailing weather, wildlife activity and ice conditions. Expedition Team members scheduled for this voyage are subject to change or cancellation.

GEAR UP

Not sure what to wear while onboard? Visit our shop and gear up. We've got layers to keep you dry and warm, breezy wear to keep you covered and cool, and accessories to keep everything packed up and ready to go. So, no matter the weather, you'll be better prepared for your expedition.

Our Gear Shop has an expert outfitting staff and features all the essentials:

Clothes for all types of weather, boot rentals, accessories and more »

Packing List »

Make sure you get all your essentials today. We offer packages or individual items, for your convenience, and recommend you place orders at least 30 days before your embarkation date.