Silversea Luxury Cruises A Scrabster, Scotland

Scrabster, Scotland

An Introduction to Silversea Cruises

The romance of the seas, small ship sizes and intimate atmosphere, Silversea has long been a leader in the ultra-luxury market. Travelling to both iconic and secluded ports, Silversea’s award-winning itineraries inspire wanderlust and exploration. With over 900 destinations, longer port stays and more late-night departures than ever before, even the savviest traveler will find something new. A butler for every suite, a complimentary in-suite bar stocked with your preferences, all-inclusive exquisite dining, award-winning onboard entertainment and an unparalleled space to guest ratio all contribute to the Silversea experience. Not forgetting our famed Italian hospitality, where new faces become old friends. Bienvenuti a bordo.

cruises visiting Scrabster, Scotland

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exclusive offer
London (Tower Bridge) A Reykjavik
  • Northern Europe & British Isles
  • Silversea Cruises
  • Salida
    jun 23, 2018
  • Duración
    12 Días
  • Barco
    Silver Wind

Tarifas desde (Por huésped)
US$ 8.000

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Las tarifas mostradas son por huésped

Excursiones en Scrabster, Scotland

Bird Cliffs and Lighthouses

Embrace the scenic splendour and heritage of Scotland's northern wilderness during this memorable, half-day sightseeing excursion.


Thurso, Dunnet Head, Lighthouse, Pentland Firth, Orkney Islands, Sandstone Cliffs

Depart the pier for the scenic, approximately 35-minute drive through Scrabster and the Scottish town of Thurso, then across open moorland en route to a photo stop at Dunnet Head. The most northerly point of mainland Britain, Dunnet Head is an RSPB reserve and home to its iconic Lighthouse built by Robert Stevenson in 1831. Dunnet Head overlooks the Pentland Firth, Orkney Islands and imposing sandstone cliffs, a haven for seabirds including breeding puffins, razorbills and kittiwakes.


Castle of Mey, John o' Groats

Next, continue along the coast and past the Castle of Mey, former home of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, and past Canisbay Church. Upon arrival at John O' Groats, the most northerly settlement of mainland United Kingdom, some free time is made available to explore your surrounds at your leisure.


Duncansby Head, Seascapes, Lighthouses, Wick, Thurso

Following your visit, re-board your coach and drive to nearby Duncansby Head for spectacular views of dramatic northerly seascapes and majestic lighthouses. Leaving Duncansby Head, re-board your coach and proceed for brief photo stops at each of the area's two largest towns, Wick and Thurso, then commence the short drive back to the pier.


Please note: This tour involves a moderate amount of walking, at times over uneven, grassy and soft surfaces, with a few steps to negotiate to get on/off the coach. Walking at John o' Groats is at the discretion of each guest. This tour is suitable for guests with limited mobility, but is not wheelchair-accessible. Guests are advised to wear warm, comfortable clothing in layers with flat, closed-toe walking shoes, and bring a weatherproof jacket or coat from the ship. Although frequently encountered on this type of tour, wildlife sightings are not guaranteed.

Bettyhill & The Highland Clearances

Experience one of the darker periods in the history of the Scottish Highlands during this panoramic, half-day sightseeing excursion.


Northern Scottish Coast and Highlands, Bettyhill Village

Depart the pier for the scenic, approximately 75-minute drive to Bettyhill, a village in the parish of Farr on the northern coast of Scotland. Bettyhill owes its very existence to the Highland Clearances, one of the darkest episodes in the history of the Highlands. During that time, landowners ruthlessly cleared their lands of tenant farmers to make way for more lucrative sheep.


Before the Highland Clearances, this area was heavily populated. Between 1811 and 1821 a total of 15,000 people were cleared from the estates of the landowner, who would become the reviled Duke of Sutherland. Nearby Rosal was one of the villages cleared of its crofting inhabitants. In an unusual move, the local landowner, Elizabeth, Countess of Sutherland, had the village of Bettyhill built in 1814 to house the displaced crofters.


Bettyhill Village, Old Parish Church, Strathnaver Museum

Upon arrival in Bettyhill, a visit is made to the older part of the village and Strathnaver Museum, which is housed in the old parish church, to learn more about the Clearances and their devastating effect on the population of the Highlands. Following your tour and a refreshment stop at a local café, some free time is made available to explore Bettyhill at your leisure. At the conclusion of your visit, re-board your coach and commence the approximately 70-minute drive back to the pier.


Please note: This tour involves a moderate amount of walking, at times over uneven surfaces, with a few steps to negotiate to get on/off the coach and stairs at the museum. Walking at Bettyhill is at the discretion of each guest. This tour is suitable for guests with limited mobility, but is not wheelchair-accessible. Guests are advised to wear warm, comfortable clothing in layers with flat, closed-toe walking shoes, and bring a weatherproof jacket or coat from the ship. Although frequently encountered on this type of tour, animal sightings are not guaranteed. Space on this tour is very limited; we suggest you book in advance to avoid disappointment.

Castle of Mey and Dunnet Head

Explore the Castle of Mey and its connection to The Queen Mother during this picturesque, half-day sightseeing excursion.


Castle of Mey

Depart the pier for the scenic, approximately 35-minute drive to the Castle of Mey. Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, first saw the former Barrogill Castle in 1952 whilst mourning the death of her husband, King George VI. Falling for its ruined isolated charm and learning it was to be abandoned, she decided to save it.


Castle of Mey, Walled Garden

Her Majesty purchased the castle, returned it to its original name, the Castle of Mey, and spent two years renovating the castle and its parkland. Included in her restoration was the delightful walled garden that, thanks to the approximately 12-foot-high (about 3.6-metre-high) 'Great Wall of Mey', is protected from the fierce winds and salt spray that blow in from the Pentland Firth. Her Majesty even managed to nurture her favourite old rose, Albertine, into scented abundance behind the Great Wall of Mey. Upon arrival, take a guided tour of the castle, followed by some free time to explore the castle and walled garden at your leisure.


Dunnet Head, Lighthouse, Pentland Firth, Orkney Islands, Sandstone Cliffs

Next, re-board your coach and proceed to Dunnet Head, the most northerly point on the British mainland. Dunnet Head is an RSPB reserve, and home to its iconic Lighthouse built by Robert Stevenson in 1831. Dunnet Head overlooks the Pentland Firth, Orkney Islands and imposing sandstone cliffs, a haven for seabirds including breeding puffins, razorbills and kittiwakes. After a photo stop here, re-board your coach and commence the approximately 40-minute drive back to the pier.


Please note: This tour involves a moderate amount of walking for approximately 437 yards (about 400 metres), at times over uneven, grassy and soft surfaces, with a few steps to negotiate to get on/off the coach and many steps spanning several floors at the Castle of Mey. Walking at the Castle of Mey is at the discretion of each guest. This tour is not suitable for guests with limited mobility and guests who utilise a wheelchair. Guests are advised to wear warm, comfortable clothing in layers with flat, closed-toe walking shoes, and bring a weatherproof jacket or coat from the ship. Although frequently encountered on this type of tour, animal sightings are not guaranteed.

Dunrobin Castle

Explore the ancestral home of the Clan Sutherland during this picturesque, half-day sightseeing excursion to the spectacular Dunrobin Castle.


Scrabster, Highland Scenery, Dunrobin Castle

Depart the pier for the scenic, approximately 1.5-hour drive south through Highland scenery en route to Dunrobin Castle, the ancestral home of the Clan Sutherland. Over the centuries, there have been many additions to the Castle; however, the 13th-century keep remains, making Dunrobin one of the oldest inhabited houses in Scotland. In 1845, Sir Charles Barry, architect for the Houses of Parliament, was appointed to remodel the castle. He changed it from a fort to a house in the Scottish-Baronial style, made popular with the Scottish aristocracy by Queen Victoria's new residence at Balmoral. Much of Barry's interior was destroyed by a fire in 1915, and the current Scottish-Renaissance style interior is largely the work of Sir Robert Lorimer.


Formal Gardens

The stunning walled, formal gardens are based on Versailles, and were laid out by Barry in the 1850s. Each parterre is set around a circular pool with a fountain, and the layout remains essentially the same as it was when created during the mid-19th century. The gardens also offer lovely views overlooking the sea.


Self-Guided Castle and Garden Tour, Falconry Exhibitions, Gift Shop

Upon arrival, take a self-guided tour of the castle (your guide and castle steward will be on-hand). Marvel at the castle's beautiful interior, décor and museum, and visit the great, walled gardens. An exhibition of the ancient sport of falconry takes place in the gardens twice daily, and every effort is made to accommodate the timings with your visit (ship's timings-permitted). You can also browse the gift shop for souvenirs, and purchase coffee, tea and scones at your own expense. At the conclusion of your visit, re-board your coach and commence the approximately 1.5-hour drive back to the pier.


Please note: This tour involves an extensive amount of walking, at times over uneven, gravel, and cobblestone surfaces and inclines, with a few steps to negotiate to get on/off the coach, flights of stairs in Dunrobin Castle and a very long, steep path with steps in the garden. This tour is not suitable for guests who suffer from motion sickness, guests with limited mobility and guests who utilise a wheelchair. Guests are advised to wear warm, comfortable clothing in layers with flat, closed-toe walking shoes, and bring sun protection and a weatherproof jacket or coat from the ship. The driving distance between the pier and Dunrobin Castle is approximately 1.5 hours in each direction. Falconry exhibitions take place in the gardens at approximately 11.30 a.m. and 14.00 p.m.; every effort is made to accommodate the timings with your visit. No photography or videography is permitted inside Dunrobin Castle, but exterior photography and videography of the gardens and castle grounds are permitted.

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Scrabster, Scotland