Find a Port

search more


silversea mediterranean cruise hvar croatia

The Croatian island of Hvar bills itself as the "sunniest island in the Adriatic", averaging 2,742 hours of sunshine a year.

Konoba Menego

On the steps between the main square and the castle, this authentic stone-walled konoba has candlelit tables and whole pršut (prosciutto) hanging from the wooden beamed ceiling. Come here to snack on small platters of locally produced, cold Dalmatian specialties such as kožji sir (goat cheese), pršut, salata od hobotnice (octopus salad) and masline (olives), accompanied by a carafe of homemade wine. They also do a special Children's Plate. Before leaving, round off your meal with pijane smokve (figs marinated in brandy), and be sure to check out the world atlas where guests sign on the pages of their home towns.

Restoran Palmižana

On the tiny island of Sveti Klement, a 20-minute taxi-boat ride from Hvar Town, this terrace restaurant is backed by a romantic wilderness of Mediterranean flora and offers stunning views over the open sea. The walls are decorated with contemporary Croatian art, and there are classical-music recitals on Sunday morning. Besides fresh seafood, goodies include kožji sir sa rukolom (goat cheese with arugula), and pašticada (beef stewed in sweet wine and prunes).


Franjevački samostan

East of town, along the quay past the Arsenal, lies the Franjevački samostan. Within its walls, a pretty 15th-century Renaissance cloister leads to the former refectory, now housing a small museum with several notable artworks.

Stari Grad

The site of the original Greek settlement on Hvar, called Pharos by the Greeks, Stari Grad is a conglomeration of smaller communities; it's also the entry-point to the island for bus transportation from the mainland, as well as passenger ferries. The town is 10 km (6 mi) east of Hvar Town.Tvrdalj. The main sight is the Tvrdalj, the fortified Renaissance villa of the 16th-century poet Petar Hektorović. The home has been renovated twice over the centuries, first in the 18th-century baroque style; a partial restoration was also done in the 19th century. Hektorović attempted to create a "model universe" to be embodied in his home. To that end, a large fish pond is stocked with gray mullet, as they were in the poet's own time, representing the sea; above the fish pond in a tower is a dovecote, representing the air. Ivy was allowed to cover the walls to tie the home to the land. Quotations from his poetry are inscribed on many walls. 8 Ul. Molo Njiva, Stari Grad, 21460. 021/765–068. 15 Kn. May-June, and Oct., daily 10–1; July-Sep. daily 10–1 and 6–8.