• Call us +1-888-978-4070 or contact your travel agent
Jan 05 2016
Silver Whisper
US$59,950
115
51
31

World Cruise 2016

Discover lands of wonder or shrouded in mystery on this global circumnavigation with a luxury cruise. Places like Easter Island with its enigmatic Moai, haunting Petra, and isolated Pitcairn Island, home of the Bounty mutineers.

With numerous late-night and overnight calls, and even more connections to re-join the ship, you’ll have ample time to explore a breathtaking succession of highlights including Ayer’s Rock, Angkor Wat, the bejewelled temples of Burma and biblical treasures of the Holy Land on this world cruise.

For a fitting finale, our World Odyssey ends in Venice, a proud reflection of our Italian heritage and the inspiration for our own Venetian Society, Silversea’s loyalty club.

VENETIAN WORLD ODYSSEY 2016

From the “Lost City” of Machu Picchu to the newly emerging nation of Myanmar (formerly Burma), Venetian World Odyssey reveals the mysteries and marvels of some of the world’s most intriguing destinations. You’ll visit 51 ports in 115 days. And you can explore each one intimately thanks to Silversea’s celebrated shore program. Small-group tours, multi-day land extensions and private arrangements provide a more immersive experience of the local flavours and cultures.

Click here to read the 2015 World Cruise Blog by Jon Fleming and follow along as we experience the extraordinary.

Lunch at The Taj Mahal

Arguably the most romantic of temples built to express love and loss is the beautiful Taj Mahal. Let us jet you off in chartered Read more

Masked Ball in Venice

Many say Venice seen in the twilight is at its most magnificent and mysterious. We embark our elegant water taxis in the early Read more

Island in the Harbor

Sydney Harbour has arguably two of the world most iconic structures – the glistening sails of the opera house roof and the Read more

Itinerary

Departing from Fort Lauderdale, Silver Whisper will sail around the world in 115 days, transiting the Panama Canal to South America, the South Pacific, New Zealand, Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Arabia. Revel in the paradise isles of Polynesia. Discover the bejewelled pagodas of Bagan. Gaze amazed at ancient wonders like Petra and Luxor that straddle the shores of the Red Sea.

Date: Day: Port: Arrive: Depart:
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
In the 1960s Fort Lauderdale's beachfront was lined with T-shirt shops interspersed with quickie-food outlets, and downtown consisted of a lone office tower, some dilapidated government buildings, and motley other structures waiting to be razed. Today the beach is home to upscale shops and restaurants, while downtown has exploded with new office and luxury residential development. The entertainment and shopping areas-Las Olas Boulevard, Las Olas Riverfront, and Himmarshee Village-are thriving. And Port Everglades is giving Miami a run for its money in passenger cruising, with a dozen cruise-ship terminals, including the world's largest, hosting more than 20 cruise ships with some 3,000 departures annually.
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica
Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined.
The unique location of the Panama Canal at Central America's narrowest point between the Caribbean Sea and Pacific Ocean provided the idea for creating a passageway between these two bodies of water. In 1880, the French made the first attempt to build a canal, but disease and financial problems defeated them. In 1903, Panama and the United States signed a treaty by which the United States agreed to take over the project. The following year, the U.S. purchased the rights and properties from the French Canal Company and construction began. The project took ten years to complete at a cost of about $387 million.
The unique location of the Panama Canal at Central America's narrowest point between the Caribbean Sea and Pacific Ocean provided the idea for creating a passageway between these two bodies of water. In 1880, the French made the first attempt to build a canal, but disease and financial problems defeated them. In 1903, Panama and the United States signed a treaty by which the United States agreed to take over the project. The following year, the U.S. purchased the rights and properties from the French Canal Company and construction began. The project took ten years to complete at a cost of about $387 million.
Manta, Ecuador
Manta is Ecuador's major port along the central coast. Colorful fishing villages, unspoiled beaches and unusual tropical dry forest make this an important tourist destination and the starting point for day trips. The nearby town of Montecristi was founded in the early 1600s. With its colonial architecture, this small town is best known for its weaving wickerwork, and as the birthplace of the "Panama hat".
Manta, Ecuador
Manta is Ecuador's major port along the central coast. Colorful fishing villages, unspoiled beaches and unusual tropical dry forest make this an important tourist destination and the starting point for day trips. The nearby town of Montecristi was founded in the early 1600s. With its colonial architecture, this small town is best known for its weaving wickerwork, and as the birthplace of the "Panama hat".
Salaverry, Peru
Located about nine hours north of Lima, Trujillo was founded in 1534 by the Spanish conquistador Pizarro. The attractive, colonial city retains much of its original charm with elegant casonas, or mansions, lining the streets. Nearby is Chan Chan, the ancient capital of the Chimú, a local Indian tribe who came under the rule of the Incas. The area has several other Chimú sites, some dating back about 1500 years. The region is also famous as the home of the Peruvian Paso horses, as well as excellent beaches offering world-class surfing and other water sports.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Callao (Lima), Peru
Founded along the banks of the Rimac River by Francisco Pizarro in 1535, Lima served as the capital of Spain's South American empire for 300 years, and no other colonial city enjoyed such power and prestige during this period. The "City of Kings" has a regal history that lingers on in its sophistication, the decaying beauty of its boulevards, and the liveliness of its intellectual life. Many of the colonial-era buildings around the Plaza de Armas can still be seen today. Walk a few blocks in any direction to find graceful churches and elegant houses that reveal just how wealthy this city once was.
Easter Island, Chile
Welcome to the mysteries of Rapa Nui, the “Navel of the World”, more commonly known as Easter Island. Lying 2,294 miles (3,692 km) west of the Chilean mainland and 1,200 miles (1,931 km) from its nearest neighbour, Pitcairn Island, enigmatic Easter Island is the world’s most remote inhabited island, famous for its strange monolithic statues.

The first settlers arrived on the island in the 4th century, presumably by accident, from Polynesia. They remained relatively isolated over a long period, living in a hierarchically arranged society that was governed by a king. Religious rites centred on the cult of ancestors represented by monolithic stone statuary, the moai.
Easter Island, Chile
Welcome to the mysteries of Rapa Nui, the “Navel of the World”, more commonly known as Easter Island. Lying 2,294 miles (3,692 km) west of the Chilean mainland and 1,200 miles (1,931 km) from its nearest neighbour, Pitcairn Island, enigmatic Easter Island is the world’s most remote inhabited island, famous for its strange monolithic statues.

The first settlers arrived on the island in the 4th century, presumably by accident, from Polynesia. They remained relatively isolated over a long period, living in a hierarchically arranged society that was governed by a king. Religious rites centred on the cult of ancestors represented by monolithic stone statuary, the moai.
Easter Island, Chile
Welcome to the mysteries of Rapa Nui, the “Navel of the World”, more commonly known as Easter Island. Lying 2,294 miles (3,692 km) west of the Chilean mainland and 1,200 miles (1,931 km) from its nearest neighbour, Pitcairn Island, enigmatic Easter Island is the world’s most remote inhabited island, famous for its strange monolithic statues.

The first settlers arrived on the island in the 4th century, presumably by accident, from Polynesia. They remained relatively isolated over a long period, living in a hierarchically arranged society that was governed by a king. Religious rites centred on the cult of ancestors represented by monolithic stone statuary, the moai.
Adamstown, Pitcairn Island
Pitcairn Island of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame lies roughly mid-way between Peru and New Zealand in the Pacific Ocean. The small volcanic island was discovered in 1767 by the British and settled in 1790 by the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian companions.

An Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom, Pitcairn was the first Pacific island to become a British colony in 1838. It is administered under the British High Commissioner in New Zealand who is governor of Pitcairn and the neighboring Henderson, Ducie and Oeno islands.

Rugged in appearance and rising to almost 1,000 feet, the island is about one third the size of Washington, D.C.
Adamstown, Pitcairn Island
Pitcairn Island of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame lies roughly mid-way between Peru and New Zealand in the Pacific Ocean. The small volcanic island was discovered in 1767 by the British and settled in 1790 by the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian companions.

An Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom, Pitcairn was the first Pacific island to become a British colony in 1838. It is administered under the British High Commissioner in New Zealand who is governor of Pitcairn and the neighboring Henderson, Ducie and Oeno islands.

Rugged in appearance and rising to almost 1,000 feet, the island is about one third the size of Washington, D.C.
Adamstown, Pitcairn Island
Pitcairn Island of “Mutiny on the Bounty” fame lies roughly mid-way between Peru and New Zealand in the Pacific Ocean. The small volcanic island was discovered in 1767 by the British and settled in 1790 by the Bounty mutineers and their Tahitian companions.

An Overseas Territory of the United Kingdom, Pitcairn was the first Pacific island to become a British colony in 1838. It is administered under the British High Commissioner in New Zealand who is governor of Pitcairn and the neighboring Henderson, Ducie and Oeno islands.

Rugged in appearance and rising to almost 1,000 feet, the island is about one third the size of Washington, D.C.
Fakarava, Tuamotu Archipelago, French Polynesia
.
Moorea, French Polynesia
Tahiti's heart-shaped sister island Moorea is located only 9 miles (14.5 kilometres) across the Sea of the Moon from Tahiti. Although Bora Bora and Tahiti are destinations most prominently advertised, it is Moorea, the ‘Magical Island’, that is the best-kept secret of this trio of famous islands in French Polynesia. In fact, Moorea has often been likened to James Michener’s mythological island of Bali Hai, and it is easy to see why. Picture-perfect lagoons and gleaming white beaches are surrounded by jagged mountains and volcanic spires. Moorea’s six mountains include Mount Rotui, which offers spectacular views of Opunohu Bay and the island from its summit.
Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
Formed by two ancient volcanoes and joined at the isthmus of Taravao, Tahiti is the largest island of the Society Archipelago and economic heart of French Polynesia. Ever since the famous French impressionist painter Paul Gauguin immortalized Tahitian maidens in vibrant colours on his canvasses, Tahiti has embodied a mysterious allure and still summons up the romance of the South Pacific as a tropical paradise. Rising in the centre, Mount Orohena and Mount Aorai are the island’s highest points; deep valleys radiate in all directions from these central peaks, and steep slopes drop abruptly from the high plateaus to coastal plains.
Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
Formed by two ancient volcanoes and joined at the isthmus of Taravao, Tahiti is the largest island of the Society Archipelago and economic heart of French Polynesia. Ever since the famous French impressionist painter Paul Gauguin immortalized Tahitian maidens in vibrant colours on his canvasses, Tahiti has embodied a mysterious allure and still summons up the romance of the South Pacific as a tropical paradise. Rising in the centre, Mount Orohena and Mount Aorai are the island’s highest points; deep valleys radiate in all directions from these central peaks, and steep slopes drop abruptly from the high plateaus to coastal plains.
Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia
Formed by two ancient volcanoes and joined at the isthmus of Taravao, Tahiti is the largest island of the Society Archipelago and economic heart of French Polynesia. Ever since the famous French impressionist painter Paul Gauguin immortalized Tahitian maidens in vibrant colours on his canvasses, Tahiti has embodied a mysterious allure and still summons up the romance of the South Pacific as a tropical paradise. Rising in the centre, Mount Orohena and Mount Aorai are the island’s highest points; deep valleys radiate in all directions from these central peaks, and steep slopes drop abruptly from the high plateaus to coastal plains.
Bora Bora, Society Islands, French Polynesia
Located 160 miles (257 kilometres) northwest of Tahiti, Bora Bora is the epitome of an idyllic South Pacific island. Emerald-green hills and crystalline blue lagoons highlight the spectacular beauty of this once quiet retreat, now a favourite destination for tourists, hotel entrepreneurs, and film producers. During World War II, 4,500 U.S. troops were stationed on Bora Bora. In 1977, an army of Italian filmmakers descended on the island for the filming of the movie Hurricane and most recently, the Vince Vaughn film Couples Retreat was shot here. James Michener, author of Tales of the South Pacific , called Bora Bora ‘the most beautiful island on earth’.
Bora Bora, Society Islands, French Polynesia
Located 160 miles (257 kilometres) northwest of Tahiti, Bora Bora is the epitome of an idyllic South Pacific island. Emerald-green hills and crystalline blue lagoons highlight the spectacular beauty of this once quiet retreat, now a favourite destination for tourists, hotel entrepreneurs, and film producers. During World War II, 4,500 U.S. troops were stationed on Bora Bora. In 1977, an army of Italian filmmakers descended on the island for the filming of the movie Hurricane and most recently, the Vince Vaughn film Couples Retreat was shot here. James Michener, author of Tales of the South Pacific , called Bora Bora ‘the most beautiful island on earth’.
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are scattered like tiny jewels over a large stretch of sea between Tahiti and Samoa, lying virtually in the center of the Polynesian Triangle of the South Pacific. The first settlers arrived around the 8th century from the Society Islands, Samoa and the Marquesas, while the first Europeans made contact at the turn of the 16th century. In 1824, a Russian cartographer put the islands on the map, naming them after Captain Cook, who discovered five of the islands in the Southern Group in the 1770s. The natural beauty of Rarotonga, the principal island of the Cook archipelago, is profound and overwhelming.
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are scattered like tiny jewels over a large stretch of sea between Tahiti and Samoa, lying virtually in the center of the Polynesian Triangle of the South Pacific. The first settlers arrived around the 8th century from the Society Islands, Samoa and the Marquesas, while the first Europeans made contact at the turn of the 16th century. In 1824, a Russian cartographer put the islands on the map, naming them after Captain Cook, who discovered five of the islands in the Southern Group in the 1770s. The natural beauty of Rarotonga, the principal island of the Cook archipelago, is profound and overwhelming.
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are scattered like tiny jewels over a large stretch of sea between Tahiti and Samoa, lying virtually in the center of the Polynesian Triangle of the South Pacific. The first settlers arrived around the 8th century from the Society Islands, Samoa and the Marquesas, while the first Europeans made contact at the turn of the 16th century. In 1824, a Russian cartographer put the islands on the map, naming them after Captain Cook, who discovered five of the islands in the Southern Group in the 1770s. The natural beauty of Rarotonga, the principal island of the Cook archipelago, is profound and overwhelming.
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are scattered like tiny jewels over a large stretch of sea between Tahiti and Samoa, lying virtually in the center of the Polynesian Triangle of the South Pacific. The first settlers arrived around the 8th century from the Society Islands, Samoa and the Marquesas, while the first Europeans made contact at the turn of the 16th century. In 1824, a Russian cartographer put the islands on the map, naming them after Captain Cook, who discovered five of the islands in the Southern Group in the 1770s. The natural beauty of Rarotonga, the principal island of the Cook archipelago, is profound and overwhelming.
Rarotonga, Cook Islands
The Cook Islands are scattered like tiny jewels over a large stretch of sea between Tahiti and Samoa, lying virtually in the center of the Polynesian Triangle of the South Pacific. The first settlers arrived around the 8th century from the Society Islands, Samoa and the Marquesas, while the first Europeans made contact at the turn of the 16th century. In 1824, a Russian cartographer put the islands on the map, naming them after Captain Cook, who discovered five of the islands in the Southern Group in the 1770s. The natural beauty of Rarotonga, the principal island of the Cook archipelago, is profound and overwhelming.
Tauranga, New Zealand
The population center of the Bay of Plenty, Tauranga is one of New Zealand's fastest-growing cities, thanks in large part to retirees and young families escaping the bustle of Auckland. Along with its neighbor, Whakatane, this seaside city claims to be one of the country's sunniest towns. Unlike most local towns, Tauranga doesn't grind to a halt in the off-season. Not only does it have the country's largest export port, but the excellent waves at neighboring Mount Maunganui always draw surfers; there's also a fun café scene.
Auckland, New Zealand
Auckland's scenery is commanded by some of the city's 46 volcanic hills, their grass kept closely cropped by those fourlegged lawn mowers known as sheep. But this city of about 1.1 million is also a cosmopolitan mix of Polynesians, Asians, and Europeans. (In fact, Auckland has the world's largest single population of Pacific Islanders.) Literally topping things off is the 1,082-foot Sky Tower, dwarfing everything around it and acting as a beacon for the casino, hotel, and restaurant complex that opened early in 1996.
Bay of Islands, New Zealand
Steeped in legend and history, the Bay of Islands has lured explorers for centuries. Captain Cook anchored here in 1769, bestowing the simple name that captures its unpretentious charm. A spectacular landscape of black, volcanic rocks and rugged cliffs can be seen as the ship cruises into the Bay of Islands. One of the finest maritime parks in New Zealand, the Bay of Islands is home to more than 100 islands and numerous bays teeming with birds and marine life. The Bay of Islands is New Zealand's cradle of European civilisation, with many points of interest relating to both early-European and Maori settlements.
Bay of Islands, New Zealand
Steeped in legend and history, the Bay of Islands has lured explorers for centuries. Captain Cook anchored here in 1769, bestowing the simple name that captures its unpretentious charm. A spectacular landscape of black, volcanic rocks and rugged cliffs can be seen as the ship cruises into the Bay of Islands. One of the finest maritime parks in New Zealand, the Bay of Islands is home to more than 100 islands and numerous bays teeming with birds and marine life. The Bay of Islands is New Zealand's cradle of European civilisation, with many points of interest relating to both early-European and Maori settlements.
Bay of Islands, New Zealand
Steeped in legend and history, the Bay of Islands has lured explorers for centuries. Captain Cook anchored here in 1769, bestowing the simple name that captures its unpretentious charm. A spectacular landscape of black, volcanic rocks and rugged cliffs can be seen as the ship cruises into the Bay of Islands. One of the finest maritime parks in New Zealand, the Bay of Islands is home to more than 100 islands and numerous bays teeming with birds and marine life. The Bay of Islands is New Zealand's cradle of European civilisation, with many points of interest relating to both early-European and Maori settlements.
Bay of Islands, New Zealand
Steeped in legend and history, the Bay of Islands has lured explorers for centuries. Captain Cook anchored here in 1769, bestowing the simple name that captures its unpretentious charm. A spectacular landscape of black, volcanic rocks and rugged cliffs can be seen as the ship cruises into the Bay of Islands. One of the finest maritime parks in New Zealand, the Bay of Islands is home to more than 100 islands and numerous bays teeming with birds and marine life. The Bay of Islands is New Zealand's cradle of European civilisation, with many points of interest relating to both early-European and Maori settlements.
Sydney, Australia
Sydney belongs to that exclusive club of world cities that give you a sense of excitement from the first time you see them. Home to 4 million people, it is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. Indented with numerous bays and beaches and gilded with a glistening Opera House, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and for urban Australia. But Sydney didn't have an easy beginning. The first residents were prisoners, flushed from overcrowded jails in England and sent halfway around the globe to live out their sentences and their lives. Sydney has long since outgrown the stigma of its convict origins, but the passage of time has not tamed its rebellious spirit.
Sydney, Australia
Sydney belongs to that exclusive club of world cities that give you a sense of excitement from the first time you see them. Home to 4 million people, it is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. Indented with numerous bays and beaches and gilded with a glistening Opera House, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and for urban Australia. But Sydney didn't have an easy beginning. The first residents were prisoners, flushed from overcrowded jails in England and sent halfway around the globe to live out their sentences and their lives. Sydney has long since outgrown the stigma of its convict origins, but the passage of time has not tamed its rebellious spirit.
Sydney, Australia
Sydney belongs to that exclusive club of world cities that give you a sense of excitement from the first time you see them. Home to 4 million people, it is the biggest and most cosmopolitan city in Australia. Indented with numerous bays and beaches and gilded with a glistening Opera House, Sydney Harbour is the presiding icon for the city, and for urban Australia. But Sydney didn't have an easy beginning. The first residents were prisoners, flushed from overcrowded jails in England and sent halfway around the globe to live out their sentences and their lives. Sydney has long since outgrown the stigma of its convict origins, but the passage of time has not tamed its rebellious spirit.
Newcastle with a population of 250,000 is the second largest city in New South Wales, located at the mouth of the Hunter River. Founded as a penal colony, coal deposits quickly led to Newcastle becoming an important centre for shipping and commerce by the 1860s. Industrialisation increased after iron and steel mills were built in 1915. Today, Newcastle, known as the gateway to the Hunter Valley, is an attractive destination full of historic buildings. The city is the commercial, administrative and industrial centre of the region and has the largest export harbour in the Commonwealth. Attractions include numerous beaches, a rich heritage of Victorian architecture and a fabulous lookout at Mount Sugarloaf.
Newcastle with a population of 250,000 is the second largest city in New South Wales, located at the mouth of the Hunter River. Founded as a penal colony, coal deposits quickly led to Newcastle becoming an important centre for shipping and commerce by the 1860s. Industrialisation increased after iron and steel mills were built in 1915. Today, Newcastle, known as the gateway to the Hunter Valley, is an attractive destination full of historic buildings. The city is the commercial, administrative and industrial centre of the region and has the largest export harbour in the Commonwealth. Attractions include numerous beaches, a rich heritage of Victorian architecture and a fabulous lookout at Mount Sugarloaf.
Newcastle with a population of 250,000 is the second largest city in New South Wales, located at the mouth of the Hunter River. Founded as a penal colony, coal deposits quickly led to Newcastle becoming an important centre for shipping and commerce by the 1860s. Industrialisation increased after iron and steel mills were built in 1915. Today, Newcastle, known as the gateway to the Hunter Valley, is an attractive destination full of historic buildings. The city is the commercial, administrative and industrial centre of the region and has the largest export harbour in the Commonwealth. Attractions include numerous beaches, a rich heritage of Victorian architecture and a fabulous lookout at Mount Sugarloaf.
Founded in 1864, Townsville is the heart of North Queensland with a population of 130,000. It is the focal point of the region, attracting many people due to its pleasant climate and relaxed lifestyle. Townsville is the port city for the agricultural and mining production of the vast inland region of northern Queensland, as well as the starting point of the main road to the Northern Territory. In recent years, millions of dollars have been spent in an effort to attract more visitors to stay in Townsville rather than heading on to Cairns. A hotel-casino and marina have been built on the oceanfront and other parts of the city are being redeveloped while still retaining many of its 19th-century buildings.
Cairns, Australia
With its lush green mountains hugged by low-slung clouds, its sugarcane fields and laid-back pace, Cairns (pronounced Caans) feels worlds away from the bustle of Brisbane or the cobblestone streets of Melbourne. Cairns is the tourist's main jumping-off point for the wild Queensland north, where intense heat and fierce wildlife rule. Along with the cuddly koalas and hop-happy kangaroos of the south, you'll find stealthy saltwater crocodiles, poisonous snakes, and jellyfish so deadly they keep the stunning beaches virtually unswimmable for half the year. Yet despite the formidable setting, Cairns and Tropical North Queensland are far from intimidating.
Cairns, Australia
With its lush green mountains hugged by low-slung clouds, its sugarcane fields and laid-back pace, Cairns (pronounced Caans) feels worlds away from the bustle of Brisbane or the cobblestone streets of Melbourne. Cairns is the tourist's main jumping-off point for the wild Queensland north, where intense heat and fierce wildlife rule. Along with the cuddly koalas and hop-happy kangaroos of the south, you'll find stealthy saltwater crocodiles, poisonous snakes, and jellyfish so deadly they keep the stunning beaches virtually unswimmable for half the year. Yet despite the formidable setting, Cairns and Tropical North Queensland are far from intimidating.
Cairns, Australia
With its lush green mountains hugged by low-slung clouds, its sugarcane fields and laid-back pace, Cairns (pronounced Caans) feels worlds away from the bustle of Brisbane or the cobblestone streets of Melbourne. Cairns is the tourist's main jumping-off point for the wild Queensland north, where intense heat and fierce wildlife rule. Along with the cuddly koalas and hop-happy kangaroos of the south, you'll find stealthy saltwater crocodiles, poisonous snakes, and jellyfish so deadly they keep the stunning beaches virtually unswimmable for half the year. Yet despite the formidable setting, Cairns and Tropical North Queensland are far from intimidating.
Thursday Island, Australia
The colourful outpost of Thursday Island is one of only 17 inhabited islands in the Torres Strait. This important shipping channel is located between Cape York on the mainland of Australia and the southern coast of Papua New Guinea. ‘T.I.’, as the island is known, was settled in 1877 due to its well-sheltered harbour. Today, Thursday Island boasts a population of some 3,500; the majority is native islanders, with a mix of Malay, Polynesian, Chinese and Japanese. The island has an interesting history, and was once the base for a fleet of more than a hundred pearling vessels.
Thursday Island, Australia
The colourful outpost of Thursday Island is one of only 17 inhabited islands in the Torres Strait. This important shipping channel is located between Cape York on the mainland of Australia and the southern coast of Papua New Guinea. ‘T.I.’, as the island is known, was settled in 1877 due to its well-sheltered harbour. Today, Thursday Island boasts a population of some 3,500; the majority is native islanders, with a mix of Malay, Polynesian, Chinese and Japanese. The island has an interesting history, and was once the base for a fleet of more than a hundred pearling vessels.
Darwin, Australia
Today, modern Darwin is the ideal place from which to explore the beauty and diversity of Australia's rugged Top End. But for the people of Darwin, everything is remembered as being before or after 1974's Cyclone Tracy, which hit on Christmas Eve and whose immense damage left a lasting scar in the area. It's a tribute to those who stayed and to those who have come to live here after Tracy that the rebuilt city now thrives as an administrative and commercial center for northern Australia. The seductiveness of contemporary Darwin lifestyles, however, belies a Top End history of failed attempts by Europeans dating back to 1824 to establish an enclave in a harsh, unyielding climate.
Darwin, Australia
Today, modern Darwin is the ideal place from which to explore the beauty and diversity of Australia's rugged Top End. But for the people of Darwin, everything is remembered as being before or after 1974's Cyclone Tracy, which hit on Christmas Eve and whose immense damage left a lasting scar in the area. It's a tribute to those who stayed and to those who have come to live here after Tracy that the rebuilt city now thrives as an administrative and commercial center for northern Australia. The seductiveness of contemporary Darwin lifestyles, however, belies a Top End history of failed attempts by Europeans dating back to 1824 to establish an enclave in a harsh, unyielding climate.
Darwin, Australia
Today, modern Darwin is the ideal place from which to explore the beauty and diversity of Australia's rugged Top End. But for the people of Darwin, everything is remembered as being before or after 1974's Cyclone Tracy, which hit on Christmas Eve and whose immense damage left a lasting scar in the area. It's a tribute to those who stayed and to those who have come to live here after Tracy that the rebuilt city now thrives as an administrative and commercial center for northern Australia. The seductiveness of contemporary Darwin lifestyles, however, belies a Top End history of failed attempts by Europeans dating back to 1824 to establish an enclave in a harsh, unyielding climate.
Bali (Benoa), Indonesia
Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities. Snakes in the garden, including commercialism and traffic, diminish but don't destroy Bali's charm.
Bali (Benoa), Indonesia
Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities. Snakes in the garden, including commercialism and traffic, diminish but don't destroy Bali's charm.
Bali (Benoa), Indonesia
Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities. Snakes in the garden, including commercialism and traffic, diminish but don't destroy Bali's charm.
Bali (Benoa), Indonesia
Bali really is as alluring as everyone says. This island, slightly bigger than Delaware, has it all: beaches, volcanoes, terraced rice fields, forests, renowned resorts, surfing, golf, and world-class dive sites. But what sets Bali apart from other nearby tropical destinations is Balinese tradition, and villagers dedicated to celebrating it. The hundreds of temples, dances, rituals, and crafts linked to their ancient Hindu faith aren't a show for tourists, but a living, breathing culture in which visitors are warmly received by the Balinese, who cherish their own identities. Snakes in the garden, including commercialism and traffic, diminish but don't destroy Bali's charm.
Sandakan, Malaysia
One of Southeast Asia's most diverse countries, Malaysia has a population of 23 million, about 50% of whom are Malay, 24% Chinese, and 7% Indian. The remainder is a mix of immigrants from other places and non-Malay indigenous tribes. Malaysia is officially a Muslim country, but Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia's two northern Borneo states, are primarily Christian, the legacy of 20th-century missionaries. Sabah encompasses some 75,500 square km (29,388 square mi), but it only has about 2 million people, of which the Kadazans are the largest ethnic group. Along the west coast, the Bajau grow rice and raise ponies; on the east coast, a group related to the Bajau are mostly fishermen.
Sandakan, Malaysia
One of Southeast Asia's most diverse countries, Malaysia has a population of 23 million, about 50% of whom are Malay, 24% Chinese, and 7% Indian. The remainder is a mix of immigrants from other places and non-Malay indigenous tribes. Malaysia is officially a Muslim country, but Sabah and Sarawak, Malaysia's two northern Borneo states, are primarily Christian, the legacy of 20th-century missionaries. Sabah encompasses some 75,500 square km (29,388 square mi), but it only has about 2 million people, of which the Kadazans are the largest ethnic group. Along the west coast, the Bajau grow rice and raise ponies; on the east coast, a group related to the Bajau are mostly fishermen.
Manila, Philippines
The urban sprawl that is metropolitan Manila is a fascinating, even surreal, combination of modernity and tradition. In Manila's streets, you'll see horse-drawn calesas (carriages) alongside sleek Mercedes-Benzes, Japanese sedans, passenger buses, and the ubiquitous passenger jeepneys — once converted World War II Jeeps, but now manufactured locally. Manila's upscale Makati City is the country's financial center, with wide, well-kept boulevards, high-rise apartment and office buildings, ultramodern shopping centers, and well-guarded walled enclaves of the fabulously rich. Getting around the city can be a daunting proposition in thelegendary traffic jams.
Manila, Philippines
The urban sprawl that is metropolitan Manila is a fascinating, even surreal, combination of modernity and tradition. In Manila's streets, you'll see horse-drawn calesas (carriages) alongside sleek Mercedes-Benzes, Japanese sedans, passenger buses, and the ubiquitous passenger jeepneys — once converted World War II Jeeps, but now manufactured locally. Manila's upscale Makati City is the country's financial center, with wide, well-kept boulevards, high-rise apartment and office buildings, ultramodern shopping centers, and well-guarded walled enclaves of the fabulously rich. Getting around the city can be a daunting proposition in thelegendary traffic jams.
Hong Kong
Hong Kong Island and Kowloon are divided both physically and psychologically by Victoria Harbour. On Hong Kong Island, the central city stretches only a few kilometers south into the island before mountains rise up, but the city goes several more kilometers north into Kowloon. In the main districts and neighborhoods, luxury boutiques are a stone's throw away from old hawker stalls, and a modern, high-tech horse-racing track is just around the corner from a temple housing more than 10,000 buddhas.
Hong Kong
Hong Kong Island and Kowloon are divided both physically and psychologically by Victoria Harbour. On Hong Kong Island, the central city stretches only a few kilometers south into the island before mountains rise up, but the city goes several more kilometers north into Kowloon. In the main districts and neighborhoods, luxury boutiques are a stone's throw away from old hawker stalls, and a modern, high-tech horse-racing track is just around the corner from a temple housing more than 10,000 buddhas.
Hong Kong
Hong Kong Island and Kowloon are divided both physically and psychologically by Victoria Harbour. On Hong Kong Island, the central city stretches only a few kilometers south into the island before mountains rise up, but the city goes several more kilometers north into Kowloon. In the main districts and neighborhoods, luxury boutiques are a stone's throw away from old hawker stalls, and a modern, high-tech horse-racing track is just around the corner from a temple housing more than 10,000 buddhas.
Hong Kong
Hong Kong Island and Kowloon are divided both physically and psychologically by Victoria Harbour. On Hong Kong Island, the central city stretches only a few kilometers south into the island before mountains rise up, but the city goes several more kilometers north into Kowloon. In the main districts and neighborhoods, luxury boutiques are a stone's throw away from old hawker stalls, and a modern, high-tech horse-racing track is just around the corner from a temple housing more than 10,000 buddhas.
Hong Kong
Hong Kong Island and Kowloon are divided both physically and psychologically by Victoria Harbour. On Hong Kong Island, the central city stretches only a few kilometers south into the island before mountains rise up, but the city goes several more kilometers north into Kowloon. In the main districts and neighborhoods, luxury boutiques are a stone's throw away from old hawker stalls, and a modern, high-tech horse-racing track is just around the corner from a temple housing more than 10,000 buddhas.
Halong Bay, Vietnam
Hanoi, which has been Vietnam's capital several times and is again today, remains a city of academics, artists, diplomats, and contradictions. The self-appointed stronghold of Vietnamese anti-imperialist culture has learned to covet foreign tourist dollars. Originally built around an imperial citadel currently housing the modern military, Hanoi is divided into four main districts, or quan. Hoan Kiem District, named for the lake at its center, is the hub of most tourist activity. Just north of the lake is the Old Quarter, a charming cluster of ancient streets. South of the lake, you'll find the modern city center, once the French Quarter.
Halong Bay, Vietnam
Hanoi, which has been Vietnam's capital several times and is again today, remains a city of academics, artists, diplomats, and contradictions. The self-appointed stronghold of Vietnamese anti-imperialist culture has learned to covet foreign tourist dollars. Originally built around an imperial citadel currently housing the modern military, Hanoi is divided into four main districts, or quan. Hoan Kiem District, named for the lake at its center, is the hub of most tourist activity. Just north of the lake is the Old Quarter, a charming cluster of ancient streets. South of the lake, you'll find the modern city center, once the French Quarter.
Halong Bay, Vietnam
Hanoi, which has been Vietnam's capital several times and is again today, remains a city of academics, artists, diplomats, and contradictions. The self-appointed stronghold of Vietnamese anti-imperialist culture has learned to covet foreign tourist dollars. Originally built around an imperial citadel currently housing the modern military, Hanoi is divided into four main districts, or quan. Hoan Kiem District, named for the lake at its center, is the hub of most tourist activity. Just north of the lake is the Old Quarter, a charming cluster of ancient streets. South of the lake, you'll find the modern city center, once the French Quarter.
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
The French called their colonial capital the Pearl of the Orient, and the triumphant Communists renamed it Ho Chi Minh City, but this former Cambodian port town is still called Saigon by almost everyone who lives here. Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) has served as a natural fortress and has been fought over by countless people during the past 2,000 years. The ancient Cambodian empire of Funan used the area as a trading post, and the Khmer kingdom of Angkor transformed Prey Nokor, as Saigon was then called, into a flourishing center of trade protected by a standing army. By the 14th century, while under Khmer rule, the city attracted international merchants.
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
The French called their colonial capital the Pearl of the Orient, and the triumphant Communists renamed it Ho Chi Minh City, but this former Cambodian port town is still called Saigon by almost everyone who lives here. Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) has served as a natural fortress and has been fought over by countless people during the past 2,000 years. The ancient Cambodian empire of Funan used the area as a trading post, and the Khmer kingdom of Angkor transformed Prey Nokor, as Saigon was then called, into a flourishing center of trade protected by a standing army. By the 14th century, while under Khmer rule, the city attracted international merchants.
Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
The French called their colonial capital the Pearl of the Orient, and the triumphant Communists renamed it Ho Chi Minh City, but this former Cambodian port town is still called Saigon by almost everyone who lives here. Ho Chi Minh City (HCMC) has served as a natural fortress and has been fought over by countless people during the past 2,000 years. The ancient Cambodian empire of Funan used the area as a trading post, and the Khmer kingdom of Angkor transformed Prey Nokor, as Saigon was then called, into a flourishing center of trade protected by a standing army. By the 14th century, while under Khmer rule, the city attracted international merchants.
Bangkok (Klong Toey), Thailand
There are two Bangkoks, the ancient soul of Thailand with its long and fascinating history and the frantic, modern metropolis that embraces the latest trends both Eastern and Western. The two blend together remarkably well-even the most jarring juxtapositions of old and new somehow make sense. Bangkok is not only the biggest city in Thailand, but also the most mesmerizing, with some of the country's most beautiful temples and shrines. The city's energy is palpable, especially at night, when traffic opens up a bit, its famous markets get going, and everything seems lit up-from its proudest monuments to its seediest streets.
Bangkok (Klong Toey), Thailand
There are two Bangkoks, the ancient soul of Thailand with its long and fascinating history and the frantic, modern metropolis that embraces the latest trends both Eastern and Western. The two blend together remarkably well-even the most jarring juxtapositions of old and new somehow make sense. Bangkok is not only the biggest city in Thailand, but also the most mesmerizing, with some of the country's most beautiful temples and shrines. The city's energy is palpable, especially at night, when traffic opens up a bit, its famous markets get going, and everything seems lit up-from its proudest monuments to its seediest streets.
Koh Samui, Thailand
Thailand’s third largest island, Ko Samui, lies 420 miles (675 kilometres) south of Bangkok in the Gulf of Thailand. The first settlers were islanders from Hainan Island (now part of China) who took up coconut farming some 150 years ago. Today, in addition to tourism, coconut palms still provide a major source of income to residents. In fact, up to two million coconuts are shipped to Bangkok every month. Most of Ko Samui’s population lives in the port city of Na Thon. Located on the western side of the island, it is also the oldest town. While originally all travel was by boat or foot, a main road encircles the island, with several offshoots into the interior.
Koh Samui, Thailand
Thailand’s third largest island, Ko Samui, lies 420 miles (675 kilometres) south of Bangkok in the Gulf of Thailand. The first settlers were islanders from Hainan Island (now part of China) who took up coconut farming some 150 years ago. Today, in addition to tourism, coconut palms still provide a major source of income to residents. In fact, up to two million coconuts are shipped to Bangkok every month. Most of Ko Samui’s population lives in the port city of Na Thon. Located on the western side of the island, it is also the oldest town. While originally all travel was by boat or foot, a main road encircles the island, with several offshoots into the interior.
Singapore
To arrive in Singapore is to step into a world where the call to prayer competes with the bustle of capitalism; where old men play mah-jongg in the streets and white-clad bowlers send the ball flying down well-tended cricket pitches; where Chinese fortune-tellers and high-priced management consultants advise the same entrepreneur. This great diversity of lifestyles, cultures, and religions thrives within the framework of a well-ordered society. Singapore is a spotlessly clean, modern metropolis surrounded by green, groomed parks and populated by 4.6 million orderly and well-regulated people, including many foreigners.
Singapore
To arrive in Singapore is to step into a world where the call to prayer competes with the bustle of capitalism; where old men play mah-jongg in the streets and white-clad bowlers send the ball flying down well-tended cricket pitches; where Chinese fortune-tellers and high-priced management consultants advise the same entrepreneur. This great diversity of lifestyles, cultures, and religions thrives within the framework of a well-ordered society. Singapore is a spotlessly clean, modern metropolis surrounded by green, groomed parks and populated by 4.6 million orderly and well-regulated people, including many foreigners.
Singapore
To arrive in Singapore is to step into a world where the call to prayer competes with the bustle of capitalism; where old men play mah-jongg in the streets and white-clad bowlers send the ball flying down well-tended cricket pitches; where Chinese fortune-tellers and high-priced management consultants advise the same entrepreneur. This great diversity of lifestyles, cultures, and religions thrives within the framework of a well-ordered society. Singapore is a spotlessly clean, modern metropolis surrounded by green, groomed parks and populated by 4.6 million orderly and well-regulated people, including many foreigners.
Port Klang (Kuala Lumpur), Malaysia
Kuala Lumpur presents modern, urban Southeast Asia in a manageable package. Malaysia's largest city universally known as KL is a grab bag of Malay, Chinese, and Indian cultures with European and Islamic influences. Colonial architecture mixes with modern skyscrapers; grand urban monuments obscure ancient alleyways where weather-beaten clerks tend to Oriental delights. The city isn't a particularly old one. When miners discovered tin between two murky rivers Kuala Lumpur means "muddy confluence" in Malay in 1857, Chinese traders promptly set up shop and the city was born. The British moved their colonial administration from nearby Selangor during the 1880s, and KL's urban sprawl began.
Penang, Georgetown, Malaysia
Off the Malay peninsula's west coast, Malaysia's island state of Penang (Pinang in Bahasa Malaysia, the national language) is a major vacation destination and a UNESCO World Heritage site. Known as the Pearl of the Orient for its natural beauty, Pulau Pinang respects tradition but is neither stodgy nor sleepy. It has gracious colonial architecture, vibrant Chinese communities, Indian temples, mosques, beach resorts, and enticing food. Its population is primarily Hokkien Chinese, though there's also a sizable Indian community as well as many Malays.
Phuket, Thailand
Thailand's only island province is connected to the mainland by the Thep Krasettree Causeway. Known as the "Pearl of Thailand", Phuket offers pristine beaches, lush vegetation, traditional villages and seascapes of huge limestone pillars that rise above the turquoise waters of Phang Nga Bay. With a land area of 215 square miles, Phuket Island is Thailand's largest island and about the same size as Singapore. Arab and Indian navigators have called here since the end of the 9th century, while the first Europeans arrived in the 16th century. Apart from tourism, much of the province's wealth derives from tin production, which started back in the 1500s.
Phuket, Thailand
Thailand's only island province is connected to the mainland by the Thep Krasettree Causeway. Known as the "Pearl of Thailand", Phuket offers pristine beaches, lush vegetation, traditional villages and seascapes of huge limestone pillars that rise above the turquoise waters of Phang Nga Bay. With a land area of 215 square miles, Phuket Island is Thailand's largest island and about the same size as Singapore. Arab and Indian navigators have called here since the end of the 9th century, while the first Europeans arrived in the 16th century. Apart from tourism, much of the province's wealth derives from tin production, which started back in the 1500s.
Yangon, Myanmar (former Burma)
Myanmar, called Burma by the British, is the name long used by its people for their homeland. Myanmar is also known as the “Golden Land” for its rich soil and the wealth of minerals and precious stones.The country was consolidated in the 11th century by King Anawrahta with Bagan as its capital. His empire collapsed with the invasion of the Mongols 200 years later. In 1852, the British annexed Burma and gradually transformed Yangon (formerly Rangoon) into a booming trading center for rice, oil and teak.Their colonial rule lasted until 1948, interrupted only by the Japanese occupation during World War II. Yangon’s cosmopolitan air dissipated after the country achieved independence in 1948.
Yangon, Myanmar (former Burma)
Myanmar, called Burma by the British, is the name long used by its people for their homeland. Myanmar is also known as the “Golden Land” for its rich soil and the wealth of minerals and precious stones.The country was consolidated in the 11th century by King Anawrahta with Bagan as its capital. His empire collapsed with the invasion of the Mongols 200 years later. In 1852, the British annexed Burma and gradually transformed Yangon (formerly Rangoon) into a booming trading center for rice, oil and teak.Their colonial rule lasted until 1948, interrupted only by the Japanese occupation during World War II. Yangon’s cosmopolitan air dissipated after the country achieved independence in 1948.
Yangon, Myanmar (former Burma)
Myanmar, called Burma by the British, is the name long used by its people for their homeland. Myanmar is also known as the “Golden Land” for its rich soil and the wealth of minerals and precious stones.The country was consolidated in the 11th century by King Anawrahta with Bagan as its capital. His empire collapsed with the invasion of the Mongols 200 years later. In 1852, the British annexed Burma and gradually transformed Yangon (formerly Rangoon) into a booming trading center for rice, oil and teak.Their colonial rule lasted until 1948, interrupted only by the Japanese occupation during World War II. Yangon’s cosmopolitan air dissipated after the country achieved independence in 1948.
Yangon, Myanmar (former Burma)
Myanmar, called Burma by the British, is the name long used by its people for their homeland. Myanmar is also known as the “Golden Land” for its rich soil and the wealth of minerals and precious stones.The country was consolidated in the 11th century by King Anawrahta with Bagan as its capital. His empire collapsed with the invasion of the Mongols 200 years later. In 1852, the British annexed Burma and gradually transformed Yangon (formerly Rangoon) into a booming trading center for rice, oil and teak.Their colonial rule lasted until 1948, interrupted only by the Japanese occupation during World War II. Yangon’s cosmopolitan air dissipated after the country achieved independence in 1948.
Yangon, Myanmar (former Burma)
Myanmar, called Burma by the British, is the name long used by its people for their homeland. Myanmar is also known as the “Golden Land” for its rich soil and the wealth of minerals and precious stones.The country was consolidated in the 11th century by King Anawrahta with Bagan as its capital. His empire collapsed with the invasion of the Mongols 200 years later. In 1852, the British annexed Burma and gradually transformed Yangon (formerly Rangoon) into a booming trading center for rice, oil and teak.Their colonial rule lasted until 1948, interrupted only by the Japanese occupation during World War II. Yangon’s cosmopolitan air dissipated after the country achieved independence in 1948.
Yangon, Myanmar (former Burma)
Myanmar, called Burma by the British, is the name long used by its people for their homeland. Myanmar is also known as the “Golden Land” for its rich soil and the wealth of minerals and precious stones.The country was consolidated in the 11th century by King Anawrahta with Bagan as its capital. His empire collapsed with the invasion of the Mongols 200 years later. In 1852, the British annexed Burma and gradually transformed Yangon (formerly Rangoon) into a booming trading center for rice, oil and teak.Their colonial rule lasted until 1948, interrupted only by the Japanese occupation during World War II. Yangon’s cosmopolitan air dissipated after the country achieved independence in 1948.
Colombo, Sri Lanka
Hot, noisy, peaceful, beguiling, frustrating, and fascinating are some of the adjectives you're likely to use while visiting Colombo. The main city of Sri Lanka (population 2.2 million) can feel like a smaller place than it is because the parts that are of most interest to visitors are fairly compact. As a visitor to the cruise port, you're continuing a tradition that goes back as far as the 5th century, when Colombo was an important port linking East with West. The Dutch used the town for trading with rich cinnamon plantations in the 17th century. Since independence in 1948, it has not stopped growing, with suburbs extending far north and south along the Indian Ocean coast.
Cochin, India
Cochin (also known as Kochi) is the great, old Keralan spice city. It consists of mainland Ernakulam, the islands of Willingdon, Bolgatty and Gundu in the harbor, Fort Cochin and Mattancherry on the southern peninsula and Vypeen Island north of Cochin. Because of the area's dense tropical forests, extensive ridges and ravines, it has been sheltered from invaders and the rest of India. This encouraged Keralites to welcome maritime contact, and therefore influence from the outside world. Cochin still has a small community of descendants from Jewish settlers who fled Palestine centuries ago.
Cochin, India
Cochin (also known as Kochi) is the great, old Keralan spice city. It consists of mainland Ernakulam, the islands of Willingdon, Bolgatty and Gundu in the harbor, Fort Cochin and Mattancherry on the southern peninsula and Vypeen Island north of Cochin. Because of the area's dense tropical forests, extensive ridges and ravines, it has been sheltered from invaders and the rest of India. This encouraged Keralites to welcome maritime contact, and therefore influence from the outside world. Cochin still has a small community of descendants from Jewish settlers who fled Palestine centuries ago.
Mumbai, India
Mumbai, more popularly known as Bombay, is the economic powerhouse of India. It is the fastest-growing and most industrialized city in India. At one time, there existed nothing but a group of low-lying, swampy, malarial mud flats passed on to the British by the Portuguese as a dowry when Catherine of Braganza married England's Charles II in 1661. After the British takeover, Mumbai started to develop as an important trading port. It steadily grew over the next century; its most dynamic development took place in the mid-1800s. In 1854, the opening of India's first railway line from Mumbai to Thane prepared the route to the Deccan Plateau, stimulating cotton production for export and for milling in India.
Mumbai, India
Mumbai, more popularly known as Bombay, is the economic powerhouse of India. It is the fastest-growing and most industrialized city in India. At one time, there existed nothing but a group of low-lying, swampy, malarial mud flats passed on to the British by the Portuguese as a dowry when Catherine of Braganza married England's Charles II in 1661. After the British takeover, Mumbai started to develop as an important trading port. It steadily grew over the next century; its most dynamic development took place in the mid-1800s. In 1854, the opening of India's first railway line from Mumbai to Thane prepared the route to the Deccan Plateau, stimulating cotton production for export and for milling in India.
Mumbai, India
Mumbai, more popularly known as Bombay, is the economic powerhouse of India. It is the fastest-growing and most industrialized city in India. At one time, there existed nothing but a group of low-lying, swampy, malarial mud flats passed on to the British by the Portuguese as a dowry when Catherine of Braganza married England's Charles II in 1661. After the British takeover, Mumbai started to develop as an important trading port. It steadily grew over the next century; its most dynamic development took place in the mid-1800s. In 1854, the opening of India's first railway line from Mumbai to Thane prepared the route to the Deccan Plateau, stimulating cotton production for export and for milling in India.
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Known as the City of Merchants, Dubai is the second largest of the seven Emirates that make up the UAE. In the entire Gulf, there is no place quite like Dubai. Its history began in the 1830s when the city broke away from Abu Dhabi and became a centre of commerce and trading in its own right. In fact, Dubai's wealth is founded on trade, not oil. When oil was discovered in 1966, it merely contributed to the city's prosperity and sped up modernization. Modern development began at the turn of the last century with heavy import-export trading, mainly in gold. What opium was to the growth of Hong Kong, gold was to Dubai.
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Known as the City of Merchants, Dubai is the second largest of the seven Emirates that make up the UAE. In the entire Gulf, there is no place quite like Dubai. Its history began in the 1830s when the city broke away from Abu Dhabi and became a centre of commerce and trading in its own right. In fact, Dubai's wealth is founded on trade, not oil. When oil was discovered in 1966, it merely contributed to the city's prosperity and sped up modernization. Modern development began at the turn of the last century with heavy import-export trading, mainly in gold. What opium was to the growth of Hong Kong, gold was to Dubai.
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Known as the City of Merchants, Dubai is the second largest of the seven Emirates that make up the UAE. In the entire Gulf, there is no place quite like Dubai. Its history began in the 1830s when the city broke away from Abu Dhabi and became a centre of commerce and trading in its own right. In fact, Dubai's wealth is founded on trade, not oil. When oil was discovered in 1966, it merely contributed to the city's prosperity and sped up modernization. Modern development began at the turn of the last century with heavy import-export trading, mainly in gold. What opium was to the growth of Hong Kong, gold was to Dubai.
Dubai, United Arab Emirates
Known as the City of Merchants, Dubai is the second largest of the seven Emirates that make up the UAE. In the entire Gulf, there is no place quite like Dubai. Its history began in the 1830s when the city broke away from Abu Dhabi and became a centre of commerce and trading in its own right. In fact, Dubai's wealth is founded on trade, not oil. When oil was discovered in 1966, it merely contributed to the city's prosperity and sped up modernization. Modern development began at the turn of the last century with heavy import-export trading, mainly in gold. What opium was to the growth of Hong Kong, gold was to Dubai.
Muscat, Oman
Oman is the second-largest country in the Arabian Gulf after Saudi Arabia, sprawling over 212,500 square km (82,047 square mi) roughly the size of the state of Kansas. The country was enigmatic and isolated until the present ruler of the country, Sultan Qaboos bin Said, assumed the throne in 1970. Since then, Sultan Qaboos has been busy transforming this once-feudal nation into a modern state. Unlike its more cosmopolitan neighbor, the United Arab Emirates, this progress has been slow but steady.
Muscat, Oman
Oman is the second-largest country in the Arabian Gulf after Saudi Arabia, sprawling over 212,500 square km (82,047 square mi) roughly the size of the state of Kansas. The country was enigmatic and isolated until the present ruler of the country, Sultan Qaboos bin Said, assumed the throne in 1970. Since then, Sultan Qaboos has been busy transforming this once-feudal nation into a modern state. Unlike its more cosmopolitan neighbor, the United Arab Emirates, this progress has been slow but steady.
Salalah, Oman
The lush landscape around Salalah is the intriguing result of a quirk of nature. Since it is uniquely situated in the path of the Khareef, or South Western Monsoon, this stretch of the Dhofar Coast is covered in fine mist and frequent rain from mid-June through mid-September. By the time the monsoons cease, the entire coastline is a verdant stretch. Waterfalls, rolling grasslands, and thickly wooded wadis (riverbeds) thrive alongside rapid mountain streams. Unique in this desert region, Salalah attracts many visitors from the surrounding Arabian Gulf countries who are anxious to experience a rare lushness in a region where rain and greenery are in short supply.
Salalah, Oman
The lush landscape around Salalah is the intriguing result of a quirk of nature. Since it is uniquely situated in the path of the Khareef, or South Western Monsoon, this stretch of the Dhofar Coast is covered in fine mist and frequent rain from mid-June through mid-September. By the time the monsoons cease, the entire coastline is a verdant stretch. Waterfalls, rolling grasslands, and thickly wooded wadis (riverbeds) thrive alongside rapid mountain streams. Unique in this desert region, Salalah attracts many visitors from the surrounding Arabian Gulf countries who are anxious to experience a rare lushness in a region where rain and greenery are in short supply.
Salalah, Oman
The lush landscape around Salalah is the intriguing result of a quirk of nature. Since it is uniquely situated in the path of the Khareef, or South Western Monsoon, this stretch of the Dhofar Coast is covered in fine mist and frequent rain from mid-June through mid-September. By the time the monsoons cease, the entire coastline is a verdant stretch. Waterfalls, rolling grasslands, and thickly wooded wadis (riverbeds) thrive alongside rapid mountain streams. Unique in this desert region, Salalah attracts many visitors from the surrounding Arabian Gulf countries who are anxious to experience a rare lushness in a region where rain and greenery are in short supply.
Salalah, Oman
The lush landscape around Salalah is the intriguing result of a quirk of nature. Since it is uniquely situated in the path of the Khareef, or South Western Monsoon, this stretch of the Dhofar Coast is covered in fine mist and frequent rain from mid-June through mid-September. By the time the monsoons cease, the entire coastline is a verdant stretch. Waterfalls, rolling grasslands, and thickly wooded wadis (riverbeds) thrive alongside rapid mountain streams. Unique in this desert region, Salalah attracts many visitors from the surrounding Arabian Gulf countries who are anxious to experience a rare lushness in a region where rain and greenery are in short supply.
Salalah, Oman
The lush landscape around Salalah is the intriguing result of a quirk of nature. Since it is uniquely situated in the path of the Khareef, or South Western Monsoon, this stretch of the Dhofar Coast is covered in fine mist and frequent rain from mid-June through mid-September. By the time the monsoons cease, the entire coastline is a verdant stretch. Waterfalls, rolling grasslands, and thickly wooded wadis (riverbeds) thrive alongside rapid mountain streams. Unique in this desert region, Salalah attracts many visitors from the surrounding Arabian Gulf countries who are anxious to experience a rare lushness in a region where rain and greenery are in short supply.
Safaga, Egypt
The port city of Safaga is located on the western flank of the Red Sea, across from the shores of Saudi Arabia. The dusty streets are for the most part quiet, save for the occasional truck or bus. Diving enthusiasts come to the few resort hotels located north of Safaga to enjoy one of the world's best and relatively unspoilt locations for underwater exploration. Their number is steadily increasing. As a result, Safaga's facilities are gradually improving. For cruise vessels, Safaga serves as the starting point for excursions to Luxor, which ranks amongst the most important destinations in Egypt.
Aqaba, Jordan
Jordan is one of the most fascinating destinations in the Middle East, offering attractions that are manifold and unequalled. The country is not blessed with rich oil supplies; its treasures lie in the beauty of the land and a unique combination of antiquities, natural environment and traditions. The rose-red City of Petra and the captivating desert of Wadi Rum draw scores of visitors to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan each year.
Aqaba is Jordan's only port and of tremendous importance to the country's economy. Countless trucks ply the route between Aqaba and the capital Amman, a journey of some 220 miles. With stark mountains rising in the background, Aqaba enjoys an attractive setting.
Sharm el Sheik, Egypt
The port and town of Sharm-el-Sheikh lies near the southernmost tip of the Sinai Peninsula where the Straits of Tiran meet the Gulf of Aqaba. With its strategic position, the Sinai posed a desirable target for various rulers over the centuries. In recent times, the last battle for the Sinai was fought between Egypt and Israel from 1967 to 1979, ending with a peace treaty signed in Washington, D.C. Since the withdrawal of the Israelis, more and more Egyptians have settled in the Sinai, taking advantage of the booming tourist trade. However, vast interior regions are still sparsely populated.
Suez Canal Transit, Egypt
.
Port Said, Egypt
One of the world's great cosmopolitan cities for well over a thousand years, Cairo is infinite and inexhaustible. Different religions, different cultures, sometimes, it seems even different eras-coexist amid the jostling crowds and aging monuments gathered here at the start of the Nile delta. But if you come expecting a city frozen in time, you're in for a shock: Cairo's current vitality is as seductive as its rich past. Like so much else in Egypt, Cairo's charm is a product of its history, the physical remains of a thousand years of being conquered and reconquered by different groups. Cairo gradually reveals its treasures, not with pizzazz and bells and whistles, but with a self-assured understatement.
Ashdod (Jerusalem), Israel
Busy Ashdod is not only one of Israel's fastest-growing cities, it's also the country's largest port. Perched on the Mediterranean, it processes more than 60% of the goods imported into Israel. Home to many ancient peoples over the centuries, Ashdod today is a modern, planned city. It's also a convenient jumping-off point for exploring several of Israel's most interesting cities, including Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, and Bethlehem.
Haifa (Tel Aviv, Nazareth), Israel
Israel's largest port city (and third-largest city overall), Haifa was ruled for four centuries by the Ottomans and gradually grew up the mountainside into a cosmopolitan city whose port served the entire Middle East. In 1902 Theodor Herzl enthusiastically dubbed it "the city of the future." The city is the world center for the Baha'i faith, and the most striking landmark on the city's mountainside is the gleaming golden dome of the Baha'i Shrine, set amid utterly beautiful circular grass terraces that fill the slope from top to bottom.
Haifa (Tel Aviv, Nazareth), Israel
Israel's largest port city (and third-largest city overall), Haifa was ruled for four centuries by the Ottomans and gradually grew up the mountainside into a cosmopolitan city whose port served the entire Middle East. In 1902 Theodor Herzl enthusiastically dubbed it "the city of the future." The city is the world center for the Baha'i faith, and the most striking landmark on the city's mountainside is the gleaming golden dome of the Baha'i Shrine, set amid utterly beautiful circular grass terraces that fill the slope from top to bottom.
.
Corfu, Greece
Kerkyra (Corfu) is the greenest and, quite possibly, the prettiest of all Greek islands-emerald mountains, ocher-and-pink buildings, shimmering silver olive leaves. The turquoise waters lap rocky coves and bougainvillea, scarlet roses, and wisteria spread over cottages. This northernmost of the major Ionian Islands has, through the centuries, inspired artists, conquerors, royalty, and, of course, tourists. Indeed, when you look at Corfu in total, it's hard to believe that any island so small could generate a history so large. Classical remains vie with architecture from the centuries of Venetian, French, and British rule, leaving Corfu with a pleasant combination of contrasting design elements.
Kotor, Montenegro
Located in Bokor Kotorska (Kotor Bay), Europe's most southerly fjord, Kotor lies 50 miles (80 km) west of Podgorica, the capital of Montenegro, from which it is separated by a belt of dramatic, rugged mountains. Listed as a UNESCO World Heritage site, Kotor's medieval Stari Grad (Old Town) is enclosed within well-preserved defensive walls built between the 9th and 18th centuries and presided over by a proud hilltop fortress. In the Middle Ages, as Serbia's chief port, Kotor was an important economic and cultural center with its own highly-regarded schools of stone-masonry and iconography.
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Commanding a splendid coastal location, Dubrovnik is one of the world's most beautiful fortified cities. Its massive stone ramparts and splendid fortress towers curve around a tiny harbor, enclosing graduated ridges of sun-bleached orange-tiled roofs, copper domes, and elegant bell towers. In the 7th century AD, residents of the Roman city Epidaurum (now Cavtat) fled the Avars and Slavs of the north and founded a new settlement on a small rocky island, which they named Laus, and later Ragusa. On the mainland hillside opposite the island, the Slav settlement called Dubrovnik grew up. In the 12th century the narrow channel separating the two settlements was filled in, and Ragusa and Dubrovnik became one.
Dubrovnik, Croatia
Commanding a splendid coastal location, Dubrovnik is one of the world's most beautiful fortified cities. Its massive stone ramparts and splendid fortress towers curve around a tiny harbor, enclosing graduated ridges of sun-bleached orange-tiled roofs, copper domes, and elegant bell towers. In the 7th century AD, residents of the Roman city Epidaurum (now Cavtat) fled the Avars and Slavs of the north and founded a new settlement on a small rocky island, which they named Laus, and later Ragusa. On the mainland hillside opposite the island, the Slav settlement called Dubrovnik grew up. In the 12th century the narrow channel separating the two settlements was filled in, and Ragusa and Dubrovnik became one.
Venice, Italy
It's called La Serenissima, "the most serene", a reference to the majesty, wisdom, and immense power of this city that was for centuries the mistress of trade between Europe and the Orient. Built largely on water by men who both defied and loved the sea, Venice is unlike any other town. No matter how many times you've seen it in movies or on TV, the real thing is more startlingly beautiful than you could ever imagine. Its landmarks, the Basilica di San Marco and the Palazzo Ducale, are exotic mixes of Byzantine, Gothic, and Renaissance styles.
Venice, Italy
It's called La Serenissima, "the most serene", a reference to the majesty, wisdom, and immense power of this city that was for centuries the mistress of trade between Europe and the Orient. Built largely on water by men who both defied and loved the sea, Venice is unlike any other town. No matter how many times you've seen it in movies or on TV, the real thing is more startlingly beautiful than you could ever imagine. Its landmarks, the Basilica di San Marco and the Palazzo Ducale, are exotic mixes of Byzantine, Gothic, and Renaissance styles.
Venice, Italy
It's called La Serenissima, "the most serene", a reference to the majesty, wisdom, and immense power of this city that was for centuries the mistress of trade between Europe and the Orient. Built largely on water by men who both defied and loved the sea, Venice is unlike any other town. No matter how many times you've seen it in movies or on TV, the real thing is more startlingly beautiful than you could ever imagine. Its landmarks, the Basilica di San Marco and the Palazzo Ducale, are exotic mixes of Byzantine, Gothic, and Renaissance styles.

Routes

For those who don’t have three months for a full World Cruise, perhaps two or three weeks sound more feasible and affordable. World Cruise 2016 is available in seven shorter segments of 11 to 23 days. Or combine two segments or more and enjoy combination cruise savings on a magnificent journey to the regions of the world that interest you most.

The Greatest Shortcut on Earth

For any travel enthusiast, a Panama Canal transit is an awesome event, a 51-mile crossing through an intricate lacework of dams, lakes and locks. As Silver Whisper snakes through the wildlife-rich jungles of Panama, you’ll enjoy a unique dichotomy: a man-made marvel entwined with untamed wilds on either side. This is one shortcut you may wish would never end.

The Cloud Forests of Costa Rica

Wander through the mists of lofty cloud forests where hummingbirds outnumber crows back home. Immerse yourself in the wonders of nature on a boat ride through the wildlife-rich Tortuguero canals. Zip over the rainforest canopy or snorkel the largest coral reef system in the country. Costa Rica is an eco-wonderland for adventurers and nature lovers alike.

Treasures Along the Inca Coast

Peru’s landscapes leave travellers breathless, whether it is the cloud-kissed terraces of Machu Picchu or the otherworldly expanses of the Altiplano, a landscape of fire and ice, wind and salt. The remnants of legendary empires abound, from Incan ruins to the sites of ancient Moche and Chimu civilizations near Trujillo.

Lima — Colonial Splendour, Pre-Columbian Treasures & Nonstop Nightlife

Hailed as the “City of Kings” by Spanish conquistadores, Lima is reigning once again as a culinary hotspot and global epicentre of the arts, while its museums rank as some of the finest in South America. Admire the splendid 17th century architecture in the historic centre, the colonial capital founded by Pizarro, and don’t leave without savouring the capital’s culinary genius.

The Echoes of Easter Island

Carved by the Rapa Nui people, the mysterious moai statues stand in silence but speak volumes about the achievements of their creators. Over 800 stone blocks, some almost 13 feet tall, are scattered amid an eerie landscape. Join us as expert guides explain the origin of these remarkable monoliths and attempt to unravel the mystery of their creation.

Pitcairn Island: In the Wake of the Bounty

The siren call of tiny Pitcairn Island once lured the sailors of the HMS Bounty, causing the infamous mutiny. The crew was enticed by the promise of a leisurely life among the islanders here, and quite a few found it—many of the 50 current residents are direct descendants of the mutineers.

Fakarava – An Untouched World

A UNESCO Biosphere Reserve, this Polynesian island is one of the 77 atolls that make up the stunning Tuamotu archipelago, narrow coral rings encircling turquoise lagoons. It is a pelagic wonderland of biodiversity, while life along the shores is an idyll of quaint villages, old coral churches and warm, friendly people. Welcome to the island of your dreams.

A Journey to Paradise — The Society Islands

The “Magical Island”, the “Pearl of the Pacific”, the “Island of Love”… the spell-binding allure of Tahiti and her islands is apparent in these sundry sobriquets. From Moorea with its legendary bays to Tahiti, home of artist Paul Gauguin, these islands capture the pure essence of paradise – both above and beneath the sea.

James Michener’s Bali Ha’i

Bora Bora was Michener’s Bali Ha’i in Tales of the South Pacific. Dive into its spectacular turquoise lagoon, pick your way through the cool shade of a bamboo forest, and discover why the Society Islands have been immortalized by world-renowned authors from Melville to Michener to Maugham.

Cook Islands: The Best Kept Secret in the South Pacific

In a region renowned for its island paradises, the Cook Islands are an under-the-radar jewel. The pristine, picturesque setting here — including white-sand beaches, thick jungle, limestone caves and turquoise lagoons — is perfectly complemented by fascinating Polynesian traditions.

Maori Myths and Geothermal Wonders

From the site of Captain Cook’s first landing to its boiling mud pools and gushing geysers, the diversity of North Island is dazzling. Admire the Bay of Islands with their white sandy beaches, pristine subtropical forests and spectacular inlets, and experience the volcanic moonscape of Rotorua from Tauranga, heartland of the Maori people.

Auckland, City of Sails

In a nation where stunning scenery is taken for granted, Auckland sparkles like a freshly polished jewel. Nearly fifty volcanoes encircle the city. An endless succession of bays and inlets stretch along its untamed shores and lush green parkland exudes a sense of spacious beauty. No wonder Aucklanders are devoted to their 3 B’s: boats, beaches and barbecues.

Reefs, Rainforests & ‘Roos

The varied thrills of Australia’s eastern coast await. Whether you’re looking up at the Sydney Opera House, eye-to-eye with a kangaroo, snorkelling along the Great Barrier Reef or roaming the rugged expanse of the Outback, the wonders Down Under never cease to amaze.

Bewitching Bali

Bali is known as the “Island of a Thousand Temples”: a Hindu enclave teeming with fascinating sanctuaries and millennia-old rituals. Of course, travellers will also enjoy the tropical trappings of this legendary island — lush emerald rice paddies, ribbons of white sand and imposing volcanoes that rise into the mist.

Wild Man of the Jungle: the Borneo Rainforest

Exotic and endemic wildlife roam the ancient rainforests of Borneo while indigenous cultures carry on as they have for thousands of years. Set out from Sandakan to the world-famous Sepilok, the renown orangutan sanctuary enclosed inside a tropical virgin rainforest, and revel in the “lost world” feeling of the world’s third largest island.

Hong Kong, Pearl of the Orient

Hong Kong is a vibrant metropolis and a cacophony of contradictions. Upscale boutiques are juxtaposed with rickety food stalls, and towering office buildings share streets with humble Buddhist temples. Though the streets thrum with modern bustle, they are laced with Old World charm.

Vietnam: A Blanket of Emeralds from End to End

Red-sailed junks on Halong Bay, water buffalo in emerald rice paddies and harvested rice left to dry in the sun; Vietnam’s pastoral beauty is the first thing to strike you. Yet as you explore its urban landscape, cities like Hue and French-colonial Hanoi, you’ll experience a cultural heritage as rich as the Mekong Delta.

Bangkok: Temples & Tuk-Tuks

The intimate Silver Whisper can cruise up the river directly into the heart of Bangkok. Take a tuk-tuk and go exploring. The silent grandeur of over 400 wats form one of Asia’s great spectacle in Thailand’s bustling capital. Stroll through the grounds of Grand Palace. Admire the shrines that line the banks of the colourful klongs. Behind a maelstrom of modernity you’ll discover the heart and soul of this ancient land.

Ko Samui

With its powder white beaches, aquamarine waters and sleepy lagoons, this tropical retreat has justifiably become of Asia's premier beach resorts. Seek out the hidden waterfalls and bathing pools and enjoy the laid-back atmosphere of a tropical paradise.

Singapore: the “Lion City”

Singapore’s reputation as a gleaming city of excitement and enterprise is well-earned: it has more millionaires per square mile than anyplace else. The “Lion City” is also a shopper’s wonderland, an epicurean’s delight, and a fascinating melange of cultural influences ranging from Chinese and Malay to British and Indian.

Penang & Phuket — Beaches and Islands

Talcum beaches lay tantalizingly close to Buddhist temples in these world-class resorts. In Penang, karstic seascapes rise above the turquoise waters of Phang Nga Bay, while ornate temples and colonial mansions recall the glory of the spice trade in George Town, the capital of Penang.

The Jewels of Burma

Turn back the clock during your three-day stay in time-warped Myanmar. The Shwedagon Pagoda pierces the skyline of Yangon, a wonderland of towering spires, glittering statuary and saffron-robed monks. In the ancient capital of Bagan, over 2,000 pagodas and temples sprawl across a high plain, one of Asia’s most spectacular and important archaeological sites.

Passage to India

Sail across the Bay of Bengal to Sri Lanka, the “Emerald Isle,” a quilted landscape of villages, tea plantations and primeval rainforest. Then India draws us with its painted elephants and the vibrancy of its contrasting cultures. Find serenity as you glide through the backwaters of Kerala from Cochin, and heart-breaking beauty as you stand before the Taj Mahal.

Dubai — Showplace of the Persian Gulf

The world's tallest tower, manmade islands, underwater hotels, an indoor ski resort — in just a few wild decades, “the little fishing village that could” has become a tomorrowland that’s hard to believe. Bedouins may still roam the desert, but sun-seekers and sightseers flock to this futuristic city and luxury shopping mecca, and development continues at a frenetic pace.

Oman, Ancient Centre of the Frankincense Trade

Modernity and deep tradition are woven together into one brilliant tapestry in the land of Sinbad and the Queen of Sheba. Low-rise pastel buildings and sparkling domed mosques form the skyline of Muscat, the Omani capital. Relax on a dhow cruise through the spectacular fjords of Musandam. Smell frankincense and myrrh in the souks of Salalah, and visit Job’s Tomb where pilgrims come to pay homage.

The Red Sea & Legends of Antiquity

Haunting Petra. The temples of Luxor. Bustling souks and Bedouin herders. Visions both foreign and fascinating straddle the banks of the Red Sea. Swim and snorkel the spectacular reefs of Sharm el Sheik. Then cross the desert to the Pyramids of Giza and stand before the Sphinx.

The Biblical Bounty of the Holy Land

The Holy Land has been a fount of faith for millennia. Along with the Biblical treasures of Jerusalem from the Western Wall to Vad Yashem, you can visit Bethlehem, the Galilee, or Masada and the Dead Sea, and experience the palpable spiritual energy that has drawn both prophets and pilgrims.

The Breathtaking Dalmatian Coast

Cruise in the wake of Roman galleons to the sun-drenched gems of the Dalmatian Coast, ancient Adriatic ports recognized for their beauty and historic treasures by UNESCO. Discover Medieval Dubrovnik with its magnificent old city walls. Stroll through Kotor’s Baroque old town and admire its magnificent setting along the largest European fjord this side of Norway.

Suites

Silver Whisper’s oceanview suites are some of the most spacious in cruising. All include the services of a personal butler, thanks to the highest service ratio at sea. And almost all have a private teak veranda so that you can breathe in the fresh sea air by merely stepping outside your door.

Owner’s Suite

The name says it all. A stylish apartment. Prestigious and classic. For those who seek the superlative level of space, comfort and service on board. For those who expect the finest from a luxury cruise.

In the Owner’s Suite, you can enjoy breakfast on your private veranda, or watch the sun set along the horizon from the comfort of your spacious living room. Pamper yourself with a luxurious bath in your Italian marbled bathroom. Primp in front of your vanity table while preparing for a sumptuous onboard dinner.

Rest easy in a space where your dreams are only the beginning.


One Bedroom: 919 sq ft / 85m2 including veranda (220 sq ft / 20m2)

Two Bedroom: 1,264 sq ft/ 117m2 including veranda (220 sq ft / 20m2)
Up to 4 US$181,350
see all features
close
Features
  • Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; Two-bedroom has additional large picture window
  • Living room with sitting area; Two-bedroom has additional sitting area
  • Separate dining area and bar
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; Two-bedroom has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathrooms with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool tub, plus a powder room; two-bedroom has additional marbled bathroom with full-sized bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe
  • Bang & Olufsen audio system
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking station
  • Illy Espresso machine
  • Direct-dial telephone(s)
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Laundry service throughout the voyage
  • Dry cleaning and pressing throughout the voyage
  • Special chocolate welcome
  • Afternoon canapés upon request
  • Dinner at officer’s table
  • Dinner for two in Le Champagne, one evening per voyage
  • Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Grand Suite

Expertly designed and exquisitely appointed, the Grand Suite is the ideal space for both entertaining friends and enjoying quiet time alone on your private veranda. With a large living room and beautiful Italian marbled bathroom, this suite offers an abundance of fine comforts.

Unwind as you wish. Sip cocktails while reclining on the furnished patio. Soak in a relaxing hot bath. Prepare for an elegant meal with your own vanity and walk-in wardrobe. Or enjoy a relaxing dinner in-suite and get comfortable while watching an on-demand movie in bed.


One Bedroom: 941–1,090 sq ft / 87–101m2 including veranda (103–116 sq ft / 10–11m2)

Two Bedroom: 1,286–1,435 sq ft / 119–133m2 including veranda (163–176 sq ft / 16–17m2)
Up to 4 US$151,449
see all features
close
Features
  • Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; Two-bedroom has additional veranda
  • Living room with sitting area; Two-bedroom has additional sitting area
  • Separate dining area and bar
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; Two-bedroom has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathrooms with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool tub, plus a powder room; Two-bedroom has additional marbled bathroom with full-sized bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe
  • Bang & Olufsen audio system
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking station
  • Illy Espresso machine
  • Direct-dial telephone(s
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down
    duvet covers
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Laundry service throughout the voyage
  • Dry cleaning and pressing throughout the voyage
  • Special chocolate welcome
  • Afternoon canapés upon request
  • Dinner at officer’s table
  • Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Royal Suite

Commanding and majestic, the stately Royal Suite is perfect for entertaining, with enough living space to roam and relax. Select a one-bedroom configuration or, to double your comfort, expand to two bedrooms by adjoining with a Veranda Suite.

Sip cocktails on the spacious veranda, where you can delight in spectacular ocean views and calming sea breezes. Engage in fascinating conversation while relaxing in the spacious living room. Or host supper with friends or family in your very own dining area. Here, experience the pinnacle of good living.


One Bedroom: 967–1,007 sq ft / 90–94m2 including veranda (110–116 sq ft / 10–11m2)

Two Bedroom: 1,312–1,352 sq ft / 122–126m2 including veranda (170–176 sq ft / 16–17m2)
Up to 4 US$143,949
see all features
close
Features
  • Large teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors; Two-bedroom has additional veranda
  • Living room with sitting area; Two-bedroom has additional sitting area
  • Separate dining area and bar
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed; Two-bedroom has additional twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool tub, plus a powder room; Two-bedroom has additional marbled bathroom with full-sized bath
  • Walk-in wardrobe(s) with personal safe
  • Bang & Olufsen audio system
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking station
  • Illy Espresso machine
  • Direct-dial telephone(s)
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Laundry service throughout the voyage
  • Dry cleaning and pressing throughout the voyage
  • Special chocolate welcome
  • Afternoon canapés upon request
  • Dinner at officer’s table
  • Dinner for two in Le Champagne, one evening per voyage
  • Two hours of worldwide phone use from your suite, per voyage segment
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Silver Suite

Style and sophistication epitomises the  Silver Suite and are a favourite among returning Silversea guests. And it’s really no wonder. From the minute you enter this suite, a spacious sitting area warmly welcomes you.

Admire panoramic views while gazing through the suite’s expansive glass doors, or step onto your veranda to relish the calm feeling of the ocean breeze. A beautiful marbled bathroom, large wardrobe and vanity table allow you to prepare for the evening’s activities in refined comfort. Wind down after an active day spent ashore by melting into your bed’s plush linens and viewing a movie on the flat-screen television.

With a preferred midship location, the Silver Suite lands you closest to all of our incredible onboard offerings.


653–701 sq ft / 61–65m2 including veranda (110–123 sq ft / 10–11m2)
Up to 3 US$137,150
see all features
close
Features
  • Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors
  • Living room (with convertible sofa to accommodate an additional guest)
  • Sitting area
  • Separate dining area
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathroom with double vanity, full-sized bath and separate shower
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe
  • Bang & Olufsen audio system
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking system
  • Illy Espresso machine
  • Direct-dial telephone(s)
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down
    duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Laundry service throughout the voyage
  • Special chocolate welcome
  • Afternoon canapés upon request
  • Dinner at officer’s table
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Medallion Suite

A mark of distinction, the Medallion Suite boasts a sumptuous and spacious living area, complete with rich textures and panoramic views – from both your large private veranda and cosy indoor sitting area.

Nestle up under plush bed linens and watch a complimentary movie on your flat-screen television. Rejuvenate after a busy day of exploring onshore with a hot shower in your lavish marbled bathroom. Relax with ease, as the grandeurs of this suite surround you with distinguished luxury.


521 sq ft / 49m2 including veranda (81 sq ft / 8m2)
Up to 2 US$127,449
see all features
close
Features
  • Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors
  • Living room with sitting area and dining area
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized whirlpool bathtub
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking station
  • Direct-dial telephone
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down
    duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Veranda Suite

A Silversea signature, the Veranda Suite offers a spacious and welcoming living area  ­– both inside and out. Elegant décor, a stunning marbled bathroom and ample sitting area provide a generous expanse of interior comforts. Whether you are preparing for a dynamic day on shore, primping for a romantic dinner on board, or settling down for a quiet evening in, you will be enveloped by this inviting suite’s warm touches.

The interior of the Veranda Suite is only the beginning. Perhaps this suite’s finest asset lies just outside, as floor-to-ceiling glass doors open onto a furnished private teak veranda. Here, each spectacular sunset feels like it is yours alone.


345 sq ft / 32m2 including veranda (60 sq ft / 6m2)
Up to 3 US$74,950
see all features
close
Features
  • Teak veranda with patio furniture and floor-to-ceiling glass doors
  • Sitting area
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized bathtub
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe
  • Radio/alarm clock with iPod docking station
  • Direct-dial telephone
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down
    duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Terrace Suite

A quiet sanctuary where large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views, the Terrace Suite provides a splendid repose for guests. With a shared teak veranda, this suite provides an easy transition from peace and privacy to the energy and excitement of the onboard social scene.

Lounge in your spacious sitting area. Enjoy breakfast in bed under the warmth of fine linens. Refresh the mind in your inviting marbled bathroom after a dynamic shore excursion. Get ready for an evening out on the ship at your personal vanity. Then merely step outside on the veranda to savor a cocktail or embrace the calming ocean breeze.


287 sq ft / 27m2
Up to 3 US$65,950
see all features
close
Features
  • Shared teak veranda and floor-to-ceiling glass doors
  • Sitting area
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized bathtub
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking station
  • Direct-dial telephone
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down
    duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Vista Suite

A peaceful enclave, the Vista Suite is the perfect backdrop for breakfast in bed. Large picture windows frame panoramic ocean views. You can watch the sun rise before the excitement of an early shore excursion, or toast cocktails as it sets behind the horizon. Whichever way you choose to enjoy your suite, the sitting area offers plenty of room to relax.

Freshen up in the stunning marbled bathroom, with your choice of amenities. Catch a movie on the satellite-equipped flat-screen television. Or if it is sleep you are after, draw the drapes and drift off soundly while nestled among soft bed linens.


287 sq ft / 27m2
Up to 3 US$59,950
see all features
close
Features
  • Large picture window providing panoramic ocean views
  • Sitting area
  • Twin beds or queen-sized bed
  • Marbled bathroom with double vanity, separate shower and full-sized bathtub
  • Walk-in wardrobe with personal safe
  • Radio/alarm with iPod docking station
  • Direct-dial telephone
  • Refrigerator and bar setup, stocked with your preferences
  • Pratesi® fine bed linens and down
    duvet covers
  • Premium mattresses and a choice of pillows
  • Plush robes and slippers
  • Choice of European bath amenities
  • Vanity table(s) with hair dryer
  • Writing desk(s) with personalised stationery, binoculars, and umbrella
  • WiFi access (fee applies)
  • Flat screen TV(s), on-demand movies, and satellite news
  • Complimentary interactive mobile content

Ports

Learn all about the places you’ll visit on World Cruise 2016. All 51 fascinating ports are at your fingertips.

Port
Hong Kong
Port
Hong Kong
Port
Hong Kong
Port
Hong Kong
Port
Singapore
Port
Singapore
Port
Singapore

Guest Lecturers

As a traveller we seek to gain more knowledge, more tolerance and more understanding of the worlds we sail to. That is why a stimulating program of enrichment is a fundamental component of World Cruise 2016. Your days at sea will be filled with a cast of guest hosts from eminent lecturers and wine experts to renowned chefs, certified ACBL instructors, and our ever-popular L’École des Chefs by Relais & Châteaux.

Land Adventures

Want to climb to the “Lost City” of Machu Picchu? Glimpse “Old Asia” in the fairytale kingdom of Laos? Follow the exotic “Road to Mandalay” in Myanmar? Or visit the ancient Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan, one of the most isolated countries in the world? Venetian World Odyssey includes an exciting array of mid-cruise overland journeys to further your explorations ashore.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Contemplate the beauty of the Red Centre and watch over the ever-changing colours as the sun rises and sets over Uluru (Ayers Rock).  Stay at a luxury wilderness camp, gateway to both Ayers Rock and the Olgas, complete with private views of this magical monolith with its Dreamtime legends.        


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Escape from reality and jettison to one of the most idyllic places in the southern hemisphere - a luxury island resort on ancient coral cay with a rainforest that is home to over 120 species of native plants, colourful bird and marine life and beautiful coral gardens waiting for you to explore. Snorkel, take a walk in the rainforest, gaze under the sea by glass-bottom boat, or simply relax as you watch the sunset. Your resort suite is nestled amid lush rainforest, accessible only by air or sea.

All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Experience Malaysian's Borneo in the Lowland Rainforest of the Danum Valley Conservation Area.  The thousands of acres of undisturbed tropical flora and fauna in the eastern part of Sabah are home to more than 340 species Birds, 124 species of Mammals, 72 species of Reptiles, 56 species of Amphibians and a staggering list of plants. per hectare.  Search for orang-utan and other animals while learning about the conservation projects during your rainforest nature treks and guided safari night drives.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Guilin has always been famous for its scenery; it has been immortalised in numerous literary works as 'the most beautiful place in China.'  Cruise down the winding Li Jiang River with its limestone pinnacles as you glide past bamboo groves, boat villages and cormorant fishermen. Visit the Reed Flute Cave to view some of the most extraordinary underground scenery of multi-coloured lighting and fantastic stalactites and stalagmites. The cave has been praised by poets as the 'Abode of Immortals.' Wonder at Elephant Trunk Hill and Seven Star Park, on this look at China's rare beauty.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Take in some of the historic highlights of modern and ancient southeast Asia on this spotlight overland in Viet Nam and Cambodia. Hanoi, nestled along the Red River with a mix of Chinese and French colonial influences is uniquely Vietnamese, with its Ancient Quarter, shrines and squares, intertwined in this modern capital.  Angkor is rated among the world's premier archaeological sites. Apart from the temple ruins, a look at local and Buddhist cultures and a taste of local fare await.

All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

Discover one of Southeast Asia's almost forgotten countries, which recently started to attract ever more savvy and adventurous travellers. Thanks to Laos' breathtakingly beautiful landscape, long history, rich Buddhist culture, and laid back lifestyle the country's isolation is now quickly changing and becoming a popular destination for those in the know. Visit the country's capital, Vientiane and temple-filled Luang Prabang, a World Heritage Site situated 2,296 feet (700 metres) above sea level amid a backdrop of scenic mountains.


02MIDSGN-N Discover Laos

Departure: Ho Chi Minh City,

Duration: 2.5 Days/2 Nights

Re-join ship: Bangkok,

Reserve by: 90 Days Prior to the start of your Cruise    


This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  


IMPORTANT:  Guests must bring two passport-sized photos (2"X2") with them.


Discover Laos, one of Southeast Asia's almost forgotten countries. Officially called Lao People's Democratic Republic, the country has only recently begun to attract the attention of savvy and adventurous travelers due to Laos' breathtakingly beautiful nature, long history, rich Buddhist culture, and laid back lifestyle. The country's isolation is now quickly changing and the number of visitors is ever more increasing. On this Mid-Voyage Land Adventure you will have the opportunity for a brief visit to Laos' capital, Vientiane and to Luang Prabang, the country's showpiece and a World Heritage Site, situated 2,296 feet (700 metres) above sea level amid a backdrop of scenic mountains.


DAY ONE - Ho Chi Minh City/Vientiane

Depart the ship in Ho Chi Minh City and transfer to the airport for your afternoon flight to Vientiane, via Phnom Penh. Upon arrival in Laos' capital city, you are met and taken to the Settha Palace Hotel for check-in. Built in the 1930s, this Vientiane landmark hotel underwent extensive restoration and now serves once again as a testament to classical elegance and gracious service. After settling in, join your fellow tour members for dinner at the hotel.


Overnight accommodation at the Settha Palace Hotel - Vientiane.


DAY TWO - Vientiane/Luang Prabang  

Following breakfast and check-out, enjoy an overview of Southeast Asia's 'biggest village'.  An interesting mix of Lao, Thai, Chinese, Vietnamese, French and American influences, makes Vientiane a charming and fascinating capital.  A morning tour of the city will show you the major highlights, ending at the airport. Most of the sites are in relatively close proximity of each other.


Visit Wat Sisaket, the temple famous for its cloister wall with thousands of miniature Buddha statues. Vientiane's oldest surviving monastery, it was built by King Anouvong in 1818, in the Siamese style.  Its grounds are richly planted with a variety of vegetation that is lovingly tended, so it becomes a restful retreat as well. Next, proceed to the most important national monument in Laos, Pha That Luang. This impressive gold-covered stupa is a symbol of both the Buddhist religion and Lao sovereignty. The exterior of the 'Great Stupa' resembles a fortress surrounded by high walls. The main stupa stands 148 feet (44 metres) tall and is covered with gold leaf.  Legend has it that Ashokan missionaries from India erected a thâat or reliquary stupa here to enclose a piece of the Buddha's breastbone as early as the 3rd century BC. Excavations have found no trace of this, but did find suggestion of a Khmer monastery that might have been built near here between the 11th and 13th centuries AD.  Before heading to the airport, stop for photos at the imposing Patuxai Monument, or 'Victory Gate', touted as Vientiane's own Arc de Triumph. It was built in the 1960s to commemorate those who fought in the struggle for independence from the French.


Arriving at Vientiane airport, check-in for a 40-minute flight to Luang Prabang. Upon arrival, you are met and transferred to the Vitoria Xiengthong Palace Hotel for check-in and lunch. This five-star hotel was the last residence of the Laos Royal Family. Located in the heart of Luang Prabang, surrounded by the golden spires of the town's famous Buddhist temples, this beautiful boutique property has been lovingly restored to its former glory, and once more sits proudly on the banks of the Mekong River.  Look out upon the majestic Wat Xiengthong - the town's most famous temple, or simply sit back and soak up the ambience of this UNESCO protected palace, the perfect place to discover the wonder and charm of Luang Prabang - the Jewel of Indochina.


After lunch, a trip to Kuang Si Falls some 18 miles (30 kilometres) out of town follows a road that winds through hills with spectacular views, terraced rice fields and farmlands. Closer to the falls the weather gets a bit cooler due to the higher elevation and its forest location. From the parking area, a short hike on a well maintained forest trail leads up some 279 feet (85 metres) to the view point of the falls. Cascades, typical of travertine waterfalls, are intermingled with basins and pools. Be careful around the falls area as the ground may be wet and slippery. Photographers will enjoy the opportunity for pictures. Then retrace your steps down to the parking area, where souvenir shops line the square.


Your return trip to Luang Prabang takes in a stop at Wat Prabath, a Meditation Temple situated on a hillside from where you can enjoy lovely views and the opportunity to watch the sunset. Often, orange-clad monks can be seen mingling on the grounds of Wat Prabath. Back downtown, you may want to take a stroll through the night market before returning to the hotel. This evening, dinner will be served at one of Luang Prabang's popular restaurants.


Overnight accommodation at Vitoria Xiengthong Palace Hotel - Luang Prabang.


DAY THREE - Luang Prabang/Bangkok

Optional: For early risers a special treat awaits. Near the hotel you can watch one of Luang Prabang's most fascinating rituals as hundreds of orange-robed monks begin their walk at dawn to collect alms from faithful residents. It is a great opportunity for some very unusual and memorable photographs.


After breakfast and check-out, discover the major sites of Luang Prabang. The beautiful setting, splendid scenery and blend of foreign influences have earned the town top billing as the country's showpiece. Located at an elevation of 2,296 feet (700 metres) above sea level, Luang Prabang is encircled by impressive mountains and wedged between the Mekong and Khan Rivers. As the former royal capital of the Lan Xang Kingdom, Luang Prabang has long been a centre of culture and preserved heritage.


The main attractions of this World Heritage Site can be seen within a short period of time and include ornate temples of and charming colonial architecture.  A stop at Wat Mai lets you admire the most richly decorated of all the temples in Luang Prabang.


Next, visit the nearby Royal Palace Museum. Once the residence of the kings of Luang Prabang, exhibits feature a collection of personal memorabilia of the royal family, including photos, musical instruments and numerous gifts received from dignitaries of foreign countries. Many of the rooms have been preserved since the day of the revolution when the royal family was forced into exile. (Shoes have to be removed at the entrance to the museum.)


From here proceed to Wat Xieng Thong, the Temple of the Golden City and one of the most important temples in Laos. The temple's rear wall is adorned with one of the best known artworks in Laos - the exquisite Tree of Life mosaic.


Conclude your Laos' Discovery with a transfer to the airport and a one-hour flight to Bangkok's Suvarnabhumi Airport, where you are met and assisted with arrival formalities. Then, board your transfer coach that will bring you to the ship at Klong Toey Pier.


Please note: This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires an extensive amount of walking and climbing of steps at all sites visited, making the tour unsuitable for guests with limited mobility or those utilising a wheelchair. Visa for Laos is included and will be issued upon arrival at the airports. Guests will need to bring two passport-sized photos (2"X2") with them. You will be charged USD $70 for a Vietnam departure visa, not included, while onboard the ship. This Land Adventure involves touring outdoors and guests may be exposed to warm/hot, humid and/or wet weather and insects; please pack accordingly. Lightweight clothing, a sunhat, sun block, insect repellent and sunglasses are imperative. Bring a jacket or shawl for the cooler region of Luang Prabang.  Comfortable walking shoes that are easy to slip on and off are essential.  Out of respect, dress modestly, with any skirts or pants well below the knee and shoulders must be covered for visits to Buddhist shrines. Some temples and the Royal Palace Museum require shoes be removed at the entrance.  Remember to bring your camera. Monks may be at the sites; their picture may only be taken after obtaining their permission and women may not touch monks. US dollars are well accepted by most vendors; local ATMs are available in some locations visited however you should carry small change. Bargaining is common at markets. Airlines restrict baggage to 44 lb. (20 kg) per person; hand luggage cannot exceed 11 lb. (5 kg) in weight, should smaller aircraft be utilised (at the discretion of the airline). The tour sequence may vary in the event of flight changes; order of sites and/or the itinerary may change.


Programme Includes:

·        One-night stay at Settha Palace Hotel (or similar) - Vientiane  

·        One-night stay at Vitoria Xiengthong Palace Hotel (or similar) - Luang Prabang  

·        Two breakfasts, one lunch and two dinners  (Lunch includes choice of two local beers, soft drinks, bottled water; dinner includes also house wine as an additional choice)

·        Flights in Economy Class: Ho Chi Minh City/Vientiane,  Vientiane/Luang Prabang, Luang Prabang /Bangkok

·        Laos visa      

·        All sightseeing and transfers as per itinerary


Not Included:

Any meals and drinks not specified above, Vietnam departure visa, gratuities to drivers and tour guide, charges incurred by the airlines for excess or overweight luggage, laundry, telephone calls, cancellation insurance and other personal items.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Venture into one of the most isolated countries in the world, aptly referred to as the 'Last Shangri-La', and discover the extraordinary Dragon Kingdom of Bhutan at the 'Roof of the World'. Bhutan is truly an unspoiled preserve with a cultural heritage that has largely remained intact due to its isolation from the rest of the world until the early 1960s. Stay in Thimphu, the capital of the tiny Himalayan kingdom, with a two night-stay at the luxury Amankora Resort.  Selfies with a view of the Tiger's Nest will amaze all and attempt the hike to this sacred site if you wish.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the start of your cruise. Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  

Nothing quite compares with Myanmar's former capital, which still retains vestiges of its royal past. This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure provides the rare opportunity to visit the legendary city of Mandalay and see its remarkable sights. Viewing the sunset from Mandalay Hill is an unforgettable experience; the pagodas and remains of the Royal Palace are equally impressive.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

In central Myanmar, on the Irrawaddy River, lies Bagan. It is one of the most remarkable archaeological sites in Southeast Asia and ranks on par with such awe-inspiring monuments as Angkor Wat in Cambodia and Borobudur in Java. Once the capital of the first unified empire of Anawrahta and founded in 849A, .Bagan is the famous for its more than 3000 religious monuments, ancient pagodas, temples and other religious buildings in its surrounds. These buildings, many of them in ruins today, constitute one of the architectural wonders of the world



01MIDRGN-A Temples & Pagodas of Bagan  

Offered on Voyages 2508, 3530, 3535

Departure: From Yangon  

Duration:  1.5 Days /1 Night

Re-join ship: In Yangon



This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations by the applicable date above. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  Although a minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme, only a limited number of hotel rooms are available.  We suggest you book early to avoid disappointment. Requests received after the Reserve By date may be accommodated on a space-available basis if possible and the programme price is subject to change.

Journey to unbelievable Bagan, where over 3,000 stupas sprawl across a vast plain.  Burma's ancient capital is one of the world's greatest archaeological treasures, awe-inspiring at dusk or dawn. Visit the Shwezigon Pagoda, the greatest temple of King Anawrahta's reign, and admire the temples that dot the horizon.  Your night at the Aureum Resort and an optional balloon ride over the plains makes this a memorable overnight excursion.


DAY ONE - Yangon/Bagan

Disembark the ship and meet your guide and driver.  Travel by coach to Yangon's Airport where you check-in for your 80-90-minute scheduled flight to Bagan. Upon arrival in Bagan, board your awaiting coach and begin your exploration with a visit to the Nyaung Oo market, a colourful introduction to the local way of life and exotic wares.


Shwezigon Pagoda

From here, proceed to the splendid Shwezigon Pagoda, a paragon in the perfection of its architectural design. This important shrine, and the main centre of pilgrimage in Bagan, derives its name from Jeyyabhumi, "Ground of Victory".  Completed in the 12th century the pagoda is 160 feet (49 metres) in both its height and width (at its base).  Its golden umbrella is surrounded by four small pagodas at the corners.  Although situated on a flat plain, many say the pagoda appears to be standing on a hill.


Next, stop to see the wall paintings at the 13th-century Gubyaukgyi Temple, depicting scenes from the previous lives of the Buddha, before heading to the Ananda Temple,


Ananda Temple                           

Built in 1091 by King Kyanzittha, the temple is said to represent the endless wisdom of the Buddha. The central square has sides of 175 feet (53 metres) and rises in terraces to a height of 168 feet (51 metres) above the ground. Its architecture, stone sculpture, stucco, glazed plaques, terra cotta, wood carving, and artwork of blacksmith are all to be admired. One of the finest, largest and best-preserved of the Bagan temples, the Ananda suffered considerable damage in the earthquake of 1979 and in 1979 reconstruction took place.


After a photo stop to take in the stunning panorama of the Bagan temple site, lunch awaits at the Bagan Viewing Tower.


After lunch, proceed to the nearby Aureum Palace Hotel for check-in. Enjoy approximately one hour of free time to relax, explore the hotel property and refresh for the afternoon.


Archaeological Museum

Re-group for the short drive to the Archaeological Museum, home to various collections of art and artefacts found in temples around Bagan. Situated at the Gawdaw Palin Pagoda, It has a collection of more than 2500 items including Buddha statues, stucco pieces, terra-cotta cups and pots. Museum also houses stone sculptures, wood carvings, metal works, lacquer works, and many more. Different postures of Buddha images (Mudra) made of gold, silver, bronze, stone and wood are also displayed. Among them, one can see the significant bronze lotus Bud, a masterpiece of bronze sculpture of Bagan period.


Village Life & Damayangyi Temple

Leaving the museum, visit the site of one of Myanmar's home industries, lacquerware.  The art of lacquer takes its roots in China, where it has been practised for over three thousand years, and then developed in all the Southeast Asia. In Myanmar the tree which one takes the resin is the Thit-si. Learn more about this art form, with the chance to purchase a souvenir if you wish.


Next, your guide takes you to a local village for a glimpse into the everyday-life of its residents before your visit to

Damayangyi Temple, one of the four most significant monuments of Bagan. This massive structure is similar in architecture to the Ananda Temple and equally as impressive.


Conclude your afternoon of sightseeing with a short ride on a local horse cart to Sunset Temple to take some photos and enjoy the sunset.


Your guide returns you to the hotel.  Upon arrival, watch a Myanmar Longyi Demonstration in lobby, arranged exclusively for our guests.   Listen as the guide explains how one wears a Myanmar Longyi ".  A Longyi is a sheet of cloth that is worn around the waist extending down to the feet and is held in place by folding the fabric over without tying a knot. Each guest is offered a Myanmar Longyi, with our complements.  You may keep the Longyi and wear it to the Myanmar Royal dinner with Traditional Show that awaits you this evening at the hotel. Classical Myanma traditional performances are staged under a canopy of stars, while Myanma customs and traditions are presented by leading academics of Myanma history.


After dinner, retire for the evening.  Accommodations are at the Aureum Palace Hotel - Bagan.


DAY TWO - Bagan/Yangon

Enjoy breakfast at the hotel and check-out at the time advised by your guide.   The coach delivers you to the airport for your morning flight to Yangon.


OPTIONAL:  Balloon ride at dawn.  Depending on the weather conditions, guests may purchase an optional balloon ride at the time of booking.  


Transfer to the airport in Bagan, check-in and board your scheduled flight to Yangon.  Flying time is generally 90 minutes.  Upon arrival, your driver awaits to return you to the ship.


Please note:  This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires an extensive amount of walking and climbing of many steps at most sites. Therefore, it is not suitable for guests with limited mobility or those who utilise a wheelchair. Comfortable shoes and dressing in layers is recommended. A warm jacket or sweater is necessary this time of year. Dress code throughout the trip is casual with sturdy walking shoes. It is recommended to leave jewellery and valuables on board. The order of the itinerary may be amended due to flight schedule changes or other unforeseen factors. In case of flight changes, the tour sequence may be reversed or amended. Remember to bring your camera. There are baggage restrictions as follows: hand baggage gross weight is limited to 7 kg (15 lb.) and size is limited to 23*36*56 cm. One checked bag must be less than 23 kg (50 pounds). As Myanmar is an emerging destination, flexibility and a sense of adventure is necessary.  This description is a general overview of the programme only and changes may be made if local conditions require. If the ship is docked in Bo Aung Kyaw Wharf the travel time to and from the ship is approximately 30 minutes less and the tour duration is shorter than advertised.


Programme Includes:

·        One-night stay at Aureum Palace Hotel (or similar) - Bagan.

·        One breakfast, one lunch, one dinner (restaurant-served lunch and dinner include choice of two glasses of local beer, house wine, soft drinks, water)

·        Flights (Economy Class) - Yangon/Bagan return. At this time there is no upgrade to First or Business Class available as all seats are economy class.

·        All sightseeing and transfers as per itinerary


Not Included:

Any meals and drinks not specified above, charges incurred by the airlines for excess or overweight luggage, gratuities to drivers and tour guides, laundry, telephone calls, cancellation insurance, optional balloon ride and other personal items.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government/citizens' activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

Kandy, the charming hill capital, lies in the midst of hills in the Kandy plateau, 1525 feet (465 metres above sea level. Steeped in history, the focal point is the Dalada Maligawa, or Temple of the Tooth, where the Sacred Tooth Relic of Lord Buddha is enshrined. As Sri Lanka's cultural centre and sacred city, Kandy was declared a World Heritage Site in 1988. A unique way to make the trip in one day is offered by private air taxi, a chartered seaplane.


00MIDCMB-K Kandy by Chartered Seaplane

Offered on Voyage 4606

Duration: 8.5 Hours


This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the sail date.  Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  


Avail yourself of this unique opportunity of flying by private air taxi into the centre of the Kandy plateau, site of the charming hill capital of Kandy. Considered to be the jewel of Sri Lanka, the town lies between hills at an altitude of 1525 feet (465 metres). Steeped in history, Kandy was the last capital of the Sinhalese monarchy. Its' most famous attraction is the Temple of the Tooth, home to a sacred relic of Lord Buddha.


Depart the ship and drive to Waters Edge Lake. Here, board the chartered Cesna 208 seaplane for a flight of approximately 45 minutes to the Polgolla Reservoir. During the flight at an altitude of 1500 to 2000 feet (450 to 600 metres) you will be able to enjoy breathtaking aerial views. After deplaning at Polgolla, your trip continues by road to Kandy.


Nestled in a valley surrounded by hills and dense jungle bordering the city's gardens, Kandy enjoys a regal location, with a beautiful artificial lake and a pagoda in its center.


The major highlight of the day will be your visit to the Temple of the Tooth. Built to house this precious relic of the Buddha, which is enshrined in an inner chamber, the temple is a work of art in itself. An impressive stone rampart encloses the shrine, which stands two storeys high on a platform in the centre of the courtyard. The upper gallery is connected to the first floor of the temple by a small bridge. There, behind a gilt railing, the golden reliquary rests on a silver table. It contains a nest of six boxes - the famous tooth lies within the smallest one. Ritual prayers by the monks are accompanied by beating drums, trumpets and hypnotic chants.


Leaving the Temple of the Tooth, proceed to the Earl's Regency Hotel and enjoy a sumptuous buffet lunch, including two beverages of your choice - domestic beer, house wine, or soft drinks.  


Following lunch, drive back to the Polgolla Reservoir where your chartered seaplane stands ready to fly you back to Waters Edge. Then conclude this memorable trip to Kandy with the 45-minute transfer to the pier in Colombo.


Please note: We recommend wearing comfortable shoes and light cotton clothing, although the temperature in Kandy may be slightly cooler than in Colombo. Moderate dress is required to enter the Temple of the Tooth. No shorts or short skirts. Ladies must have their shoulders covered. Shoes have to be removed prior to entering the temple (you may want to bring a pair of socks as the pavement may be hot). There is a walk of about 10 minutes to the temple as vehicles cannot approach the building. Walking is on both firm and uneven surface, plus a considerable number of steps need to be climbed at the Temple of the Tooth. Being a popular pilgrim site, guests may encounter a line waiting to go inside. The chartered seaplane is exclusive for Silversea. Therefore a minimum is required to operate, but space is limited. Operation may be subject to weather.


Programme Includes:

·        Roundtrip Chartered Seaplane flight - Colombo/Kandy/Colombo

·        Lunch at Earl Regency Hotel  (includes choice of two beverages, local beer, house wine, soft drinks)

·        Bottled water on coach

·        All sightseeing and transfers as per itinerary


Not Included:

Any meals and drinks not specified above, gratuities to drivers and tour guides, telephone calls, cancellation insurance, and other personal items.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, private game reserves, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Land Programmes

There are few places in the world that evoke such profound impact on its visitors as the Taj Mahal in Agra. Once the capital of the great Mughal Empire, Agra in itself is well worth a visit for its repository of some of the Mughals' most famous monuments. Both the Taj Mahal and the Agra Fort have been declared UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 1983. There are few places in the world that compare with the Pink City of Jaipur, where you stay on this magical journey into India's wonders.


03MIDCMB-A Agra, Taj Mahal & Jaipur

Duration: 4 Days/ 3 Nights

Offered on Voyage 4606


This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires advance booking through Silversea Reservations no later than 90 days prior to the sail date.  Requests received after this date may be accommodated on a space-available basis and the programme price is subject to change. Payment in full is due within 120 days prior to sailing. This programme is non-refundable if cancelled within 90 days of sailing.  A minimum number of participants is required to operate this programme.  


A visit to India's treasured World Heritage Sites evokes images of royalty and legendary tales of love and valour. There are few places in the world that compare with the mesmerising Taj Mahal and the awe-inspiring Agra Fort. Jaipur is known as the 'Pink City' for its pink sandstone buildings. These outstanding attractions are amongst India's 'jewels in the crown', drawing thousands of visitors each year from all over the globe. From the magnificent and timeless beauty of the Taj Mahal to the imposing Agra Fort and the shimmering buildings of the 'Pink City', guests are able to enjoy a treasure trove of unforgettable sights that will enthral even the most jaded traveller.


DAY ONE - Colombo/Delhi

Depart the ship and transfer to the Colombo airport for a scheduled flight to Delhi of just over 3.5 hours in length. Lunch is served in-flight. Upon arrival, you are met and taken to The Oberoi for check-in. The Oberoi New Delhi represents contemporary Indian style in the bustling heart of New Delhi, with a mix of traditional luxury and modern amenities. Dinner is served at the hotel.


Overnight accommodation at The Oberoi - Delhi.


DAY TWO - Delhi/Agra  

After breakfast and check out, depart the hotel and commence the journey to Agra, a drive of approximately 3.5 hours with a rest stop en route. As the coach passes through farmlands, your guide will fill you in on the region and its people.


Welcome to Agra! As the capital of the Mughal dynasties in the 16th and 17th centuries, Agra also was the repository of many of the Mughals most famous monuments. The city has long astonished visitors with sites that date back to the Mughal empire.


Proceed directly to The Oberoi Amarvilas for lunch and check-in. The luxury hotel is a mere 650 yards (600 metres) from the Taj Mahal, thus offering you a first glimpse of the stunningly beautiful mausoleum.


This afternoon, visit the Agra Fort, the town's second important attraction after the Taj Mahal. The massive fort contains within its 1.5 mile-long (2.5 km-long), red sandstone walls the imperial city of the Mughal rulers. It comprises fairy-tale palaces, audience halls and two beautiful mosques. Founded in the 16th century, the vast complex experienced many additions by subsequent rulers. Here Shah Jehan was held captive by his son and spent his days gazing out from his room toward the Taj Mahal across the river.


Leave Agra Fort and proceed for a sunset visit to the Taj Mahal - Shah Jehan's enduring monument to love. The unique beauty of this magnificent mausoleum in pure white marble provides a breathtaking image as soon as you emerge from the arched entry gateway. Emperor Shah Jehan, fifth of the great Mughal emperors was devoted to his wife Mumtaz Mahal, meaning literally jewel of the palace. She died at the age of 39 giving birth to their fourteenth child. The shah envisioned a memorial that would surpass anything the world had ever seen. Thousands of labourers and skilled craftsmen from Persia, Turkey, France and Italy were commissioned to construct this incredible masterpiece. The rays of the setting sun make the monument a wonder to behold. You can enter the mausoleum and stroll around the extensive grounds.


Return to the hotel, where dinner is served.


Overnight accommodation at The Oberoi Amarvilas - Agra.


DAY THREE - Agra/Jaipur

For another look at the Taj Mahal during sunrise you will leave the hotel before breakfast. Then, return to the hotel and enjoy breakfast followed by check out. Commence the four-hour drive to Jaipur, with a comfort stop en route. Arriving at the Rambagh Palace Hotel, you are invited to lunch and afterwards, to check-in. From the home of the queen's favourite handmaiden, to royal guesthouse and hunting lodge, and later as the residence of the Maharaja, Rambagh Palace, the 'Jewel of Jaipur' has stepped gracefully through many royal transitions. Its elegant rooms, marbled corridors and majestic gardens echo with history, and every corner has a story to tell. The sprawling hotel was built in Indo-Saracenic style and served as a royal residence for many years before being converted into one of the country's premier hotels.


Welcome to Jaipur, the Pink City that glows with a singular beauty derived from the shimmering pink sandstone used everywhere in its construction. The effect of this glorious extravagance, most especially at sunset, has enchanted visitors for centuries.  This afternoon a tour of the city awaits you. Nestled in the Aravali Hills, the city was built in 1727 to the highest standards of city planning. Its founder was Jai Singh II, an extraordinary man who was not only a Prince, but also a military champion of his people and a dedicated astronomer who built advanced observatories in Jaipur, Delhi and elsewhere in India.


Your first stop is the mesmerising City Palace. In an unending series of delights, from its grand aged entrance to the play of ornamental fountains, the City Palace is a dazzling showplace of Hindu and Mughal architecture. Amongst the pleasures of the Palace is a museum with ample evidence of opulence. Visit the neighbouring Jantar Mantar, the Observatory. Built from 1728 to 1734 by Maharaja Jai Singh, Jantar Mantar was constructed on a grand scale and was way beyond its time.


Return to your hotel where dinner is served before you retire for the evening.

        

Overnight accommodation at Rambagh Palace Hotel - Jaipur



DAY FOUR - Jaipur/Mumbai/Embark  

An early breakfast is served at the hotel prior to check-out and your transfer to the airport. Check-in for the 95-minute, scheduled flight to Mumbai, anticipated to depart at approximately 8:00 am. Your coach and guide await your arrival at Mumbai's airport, and offer you a panoramic tour of some of the city's highlights before taking you to the pier.


Re-join the ship in time for lunch and to enjoy the rest of the day in city known as the 'gateway to India'.  



Please note:  This Mid-Voyage Land Adventure requires an extensive amount of walking with many steps to climb at the Taj Mahal and Agra Fort. It is not suitable for guests with limited mobility or those who utilise a wheelchair.  This programme involves fairly long drives. The driving distance between Delhi and Agra is now 3-3.5 hours instead of 4.5 hours, due to the opening of a new highway. The drive to Jaipur is approximately 4 hours in duration. All vehicles utilised are the best available; they may not always be to western standards. Pack lightly; luggage weight restriction is limited to 33 lb (15 kg).  Include lightweight clothing and comfortable walking shoes. Remember to bring sunscreen, a hat and your camera. Shoe covers are provided for the interior visit of Taj Mahal mausoleum.  The tour itinerary and order of sites are subject to change without prior notice and airline alterations to the flight schedules may affect the tour content. Space is limited, but a minimum of participants is required to operate this excursion. Guests must be in possession of an Indian visa obtained prior to joining the cruise.  Visa details must be communicated to Silversea no later than 60 days prior to the operation of this Mid-Voyage Land Adventure.


Programme Includes:

·        One-night stay at The Oberoi New Delhi (or similar) - Delhi

·        One-night stay at The Oberoi Amarvilas (or similar) - Agra

·        One-night stay at Rambagh Palace (or similar) - Jaipur

·        Scheduled flights, Economy-Class: Colombo/Delhi and Jaipur/Mumbai (Business Class may be requested at a supplemental charge per flight and at this time is only offered Colombo/Delhi, subject to availability. Business class flights between Jaipur and Mumbai are based on equipment utilised and are quoted separately, if available)

·        Three breakfasts, two lunches plus one lunch in-flight, and three dinners (lunch and dinner include choice of two beverages, local beer, house wine, soft drinks)

·        Roundtrip transfer by battery operated vehicles to and from the Taj Mahal entrance gate

·        Shoe covers at the Taj Mahal to enter mausoleum

·        Still and video camera fees

·        Bottled water on coach

·        All sightseeing and transfers as per itinerary


Not Included:

Indian visa, any meals and drinks not specified above, charges incurred by the airlines for excess or overweight luggage, gratuities to drivers and tour guides, laundry, telephone calls, cancellation insurance, and other personal items.


All Land Adventures require a minimum number of participants in order to operate as described.  If this minimum number is not met, Silversea reserves the right to offer the programme at a different rate based on private arrangements, or to cancel the specific departure.  Silversea's published cruise cancellation policy will remain in effect.  All Land Adventure fares are subject to change and are not guaranteed until payment is received in full by Silversea.   Onboard Spending Credit may not be applied to the purchase of this programme. All Land Adventures are non-transferable and non-refundable for any reason, within 90 days of sailing and are recommended to guests 18 years of age and older.  This description is a general overview of this programme.  Our local operator reserves the right to substitute other sites if local situations, including holidays, changes made by airlines, government activities, and weather, require.  The programme described in this brochure is provided by independent contractors. Silversea acts solely as ticketing agent. Silversea shall have no obligation or liability of any kind to guests for the business practices, acts or omissions in connection with or arising out of arrangements with independent contractors, including but not limited to airline carriers, ground-tour operators, private game reserves, and hotels since they are neither agents for nor employees of Silversea Cruises. Silversea's liability does not extend beyond the vessel.

Benefits

Luxurious benefits that ensure you travel in comfort and that add an array of enriching cultural events make this voyage-of-a-lifetime an even more extraordinary experience.

An impressive array of value-added benefits and exclusive cultural events … all designed to make the luxury Venetian World Odyssey 2016 world cruise truly a voyage of a lifetime.

THE BENEFITS OF A FULL WORLD CRUISE:
  • Business Class air is available from select US/Canadian air gateways for guests who book in the US office.
    Business Class air is available from select UK air gateways for guests who book in the UK office.
    Business Class air is available from select German/Scandinavian gateways for guest who book in the EU office.
  • $4,000 Onboard Spending Credit per double occupancy suite
  • Gala Bon Voyage reception, dinner and overnight accommodation the evening of January 4 at Mandarin Oriental Miami
  • Three Exclusive World Cruise Events:
    Lunch at the Taj Mahal
    Masked Ball in Venice
    Island in the Harbor
  • Three Silversea Experiences for guests travelling 50+ days:
    Easter Island
    Junks of Halong Bay
    Music in Muscat
    Special Commemorative Gifts
  • Complimentary Silver Shore Baggage Valet between home and ship in Fort Lauderdale and Venice
  • Complimentary Laundry Service
  • Complimentary Internet Package

 

Restrictions Apply — See World Cruise 2016 Terms & Conditions for full details.