• Call us +1-888-978-4070 or contact your travel agent
Contact us
Call us +1-888-978-4070 or contact your travel agent

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America

Silversea Cruises
Dec 22, 2015 14 Days
Silver Whisper 4533
US$6,550 per guest
Date: Day: Port: Arrive: Depart:
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
In the 1960s Fort Lauderdale's beachfront was lined with T-shirt shops interspersed with quickie-food outlets, and downtown consisted of a lone office tower, some dilapidated government buildings, and motley other structures waiting to be razed. Today the beach is home to upscale shops and restaurants, while downtown has exploded with new office and luxury residential development. The entertainment and shopping areas-Las Olas Boulevard, Las Olas Riverfront, and Himmarshee Village-are thriving. And Port Everglades is giving Miami a run for its money in passenger cruising, with a dozen cruise-ship terminals, including the world's largest, hosting more than 20 cruise ships with some 3,000 departures annually.
Pre-Post Cruise Hotel in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, has witnessed Spanish invasions and hosted pirates, who made it their headquarters for raids along the Spanish Main. The heritage of old Nassau blends the Southern charm of British loyalists from the Carolinas, the African tribal traditions of freed slaves, and a bawdy history of blockade-running during the Civil War and rum-running in the Roaring 1920s. The sheltered harbor bustles with cruise ship hubbub, while a block away, broad, palm-lined Bay Street is alive with commercial activity. Over it all is a subtle layer of civility and sophistication, derived from three centuries of British rule. Nassau's charm, however, is often lost in its commercialism.
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, has witnessed Spanish invasions and hosted pirates, who made it their headquarters for raids along the Spanish Main. The heritage of old Nassau blends the Southern charm of British loyalists from the Carolinas, the African tribal traditions of freed slaves, and a bawdy history of blockade-running during the Civil War and rum-running in the Roaring 1920s. The sheltered harbor bustles with cruise ship hubbub, while a block away, broad, palm-lined Bay Street is alive with commercial activity. Over it all is a subtle layer of civility and sophistication, derived from three centuries of British rule. Nassau's charm, however, is often lost in its commercialism.
Nassau, Bahamas
Nassau, the capital of the Bahamas, has witnessed Spanish invasions and hosted pirates, who made it their headquarters for raids along the Spanish Main. The heritage of old Nassau blends the Southern charm of British loyalists from the Carolinas, the African tribal traditions of freed slaves, and a bawdy history of blockade-running during the Civil War and rum-running in the Roaring 1920s. The sheltered harbor bustles with cruise ship hubbub, while a block away, broad, palm-lined Bay Street is alive with commercial activity. Over it all is a subtle layer of civility and sophistication, derived from three centuries of British rule. Nassau's charm, however, is often lost in its commercialism.
Willemstad, Curaçao, Netherlands Antilles
Try to be on deck as your ship sails into Curaçao. The tiny Queen Emma floating bridge swings aside to allow ships to pass through the narrow channel. Pastel gingerbread buildings on shore look like dollhouses, especially from a large cruise ship. Although the gabled roofs and red tiles show a Dutch influence, the gleeful colors of the facades are peculiar to Curaçao. It's said that an early governor of the island suffered from migraines that were aggravated by the color white, so all the houses were painted in hues from magenta to mauve. Thirty-five mi (56 km) north of Venezuela and 42 mi (68 km) east of Aruba, Curaçao is, at 38 mi (61 km) long and 3 to 7.
Oranjestad, Aruba
Aruba, the smallest of the so-called ABC Islands, lies a mere 15 miles north of Venezuela. Like its sister islands, Bonaire and Curaçao, Aruba has scant vegetation. Its landscape consists mainly of scruffy bits of foliage, including cacti and the curious wind-bent divi-divi trees, huge boulders and interesting caves. The chief attractions are the magnificent beaches, turquoise waters and spectacular marine life, which lure scores of visitors each year to the island. Palm Beach is said to be one of the ten best beaches in the world. Here a string of hotels with glitzy casinos, restaurants and exotic boutiques line several miles of white sand beach.
Santa Marta, Colombia
Santa Marta, Colombia’s oldest city, is situated on the Caribbean coast and boasts a fine natural harbour, beaches and a splendid view. That is only part of the reason the Spaniards chose this as their first settlement. Their choice was also influenced by gold. Founded by the Spanish explorer Rodrigo de Bastidas in 1525, Santa Marta was often sacked by corsairs in the 16th century. During colonial times, the city was important as an outlet for the Magdalena River Valley. It remained royalist during the revolution and was liberated in 1821 and became a refuge for Simon Bolivar, who died at the nearby San Pedro de Alejandrino village.
Cartagena, Colombia
Ever wonder what the "Spanish Main" refers to? This is it. Colombia's Caribbean coast invokes ghosts of conquistadors, pirates, and missionaries journeying to the New World in search of wealth, either material or spiritual. Anchoring this shore is Cartagena-poetically, and officially, "Cartagena de Indias" (Cartagena of the Indies). Founded in 1533, it was one of Latin America's most magnificent colonial cities. Gold and silver passed through here en route to Spain, making Cartagena an obvious target for pirates, hence the construction of its trademark walls and fortresses.
Colon (Spanish for Columbus), with its three modern ports, is one of the Caribbean’s most important shipping terminals. It is connected to Panama City by road, rail, air and, of course, the Panama Canal. The Silver Cloud is scheduled to dock at the neighboring port of Cristóbal, which features extensive facilities for cruise vessels and their passengers. Colon is the second largest city in Panama with a population of just over 200,000. The city was founded in 1850 by Americans working on the Panama railroad and named Aspinwall for one of the railway engineers. Following completion in 1855, Colon gained in importance, which was furthered by the plans for an isthmian canal.
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica
Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined.
Puerto Limón, Costa Rica
Christopher Columbus became Costa Rica's first tourist when he landed on this stretch of coast in 1502 during his fourth and final voyage to the New World. Expecting to find vast mineral wealth, he named the region Costa Rica ("rich coast"). Imagine the Spaniards' surprise eventually to find there was none. Save for a brief skirmish some six decades ago, the country did prove itself rich in a long tradition of peace and democracy. No other country in Latin America can make that claim. Costa Rica is also abundantly rich in natural beauty, managing to pack beaches, volcanoes, rain forests, and diverse animal life into an area the size of Vermont and New Hampshire combined.
George Town, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
The largest of the Cayman Islands, Grand Cayman, is one of the Caribbean's favourite getaways, particularly for watersports lovers. The Caymans fully deserve their reputation as a paradise for divers: Translucent waters and a colourful variety of marine life are protected by the government, which has designated a number of marine parks. Several shipwrecks add to the underwater attractions and the number of professional diving companies outrank those in any other Caribbean island. Diving is not the only sport here; visitors can engage in numerous other watersports, in addition to golf and tennis.
George Town, Grand Cayman, Cayman Islands
The largest of the Cayman Islands, Grand Cayman, is one of the Caribbean's favourite getaways, particularly for watersports lovers. The Caymans fully deserve their reputation as a paradise for divers: Translucent waters and a colourful variety of marine life are protected by the government, which has designated a number of marine parks. Several shipwrecks add to the underwater attractions and the number of professional diving companies outrank those in any other Caribbean island. Diving is not the only sport here; visitors can engage in numerous other watersports, in addition to golf and tennis.
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
In the 1960s Fort Lauderdale's beachfront was lined with T-shirt shops interspersed with quickie-food outlets, and downtown consisted of a lone office tower, some dilapidated government buildings, and motley other structures waiting to be razed. Today the beach is home to upscale shops and restaurants, while downtown has exploded with new office and luxury residential development. The entertainment and shopping areas-Las Olas Boulevard, Las Olas Riverfront, and Himmarshee Village-are thriving. And Port Everglades is giving Miami a run for its money in passenger cruising, with a dozen cruise-ship terminals, including the world's largest, hosting more than 20 cruise ships with some 3,000 departures annually.
Included in this Cruise
  • Spacious suites – over 85% with private verandas
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Butler service in every suite – all guests are pampered equally
  • Open-seating dining options – dine when and with whomever you please
  • Diversity of dining venues – casual, romantic, regional delicacies, and gourmet cuisine inspired by Relais & Châteaux
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship – select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees and soft drinks, plus your own tailored mini-bar
  • In-suite dining and 24-hour room service – always complimentary, always available
  • Sophisticated entertainment from live music to production shows
  • Enrichment lecturers and destination consultants
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Gratuities always included in your fare

Silver Whisper,

Silversea Cruises
The amenities of a grand resort. The charms of a stylish boutique hotel. Silversea’s Millennium Class ships Silver Whisper and sister ship Silver Shadow invite you to enjoy Silversea’s world-class accommodations, shipboard conviviality and warm, individualized service, paired with the enhanced spaces and amenities of a larger ship. Revel in the pampering treatments of an expanded wellness spa, shop the hottest trends from top designers at our shipboard boutiques, and enjoy dynamic full-scale productions in a multi-tiered show lounge. Silver Whisper luxury cruise ship has it all. Design your own schedule … or no schedule at all … Silver Whisper.
ship
Key Facts
refurbished2010
crew302
guests 382
tonnage 28,258
length 610 Feet/186 Metres
width 81.8 Feet/24.9 Metres
speed 18.5 Knots
built 2001
registry Bahamas
Select you Suite
Photo Gallery
Deck Plan
Select your suite
Select your suite

Silversea Cruises Grande Hotel programme includes breakfast daily, hotel porterage, a private vehicle transfer between the hotel and airport, and a small group transfer between the hotel and pier.


The Ritz-Carlton, Fort Lauderdale infuses the Gold Coast with casual luxury as the city's first and only AAA Five Diamond hotel. Perched above the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway, this beachfront hotel includes a 2,200 square foot Ritz-Carlton Club Lounge; a 29,000 square foot oceanfront sundeck with an infinity pool and private cabanas; full-service luxury spa with an organic and botanical treatment menu; and, a water-view fitness center.  Four dining and entertainment options include Via Luna Restaurant with seating indoors or al fresco on an oceanfront patio, the dramatic oceanfront Via Luna Bar, a private Wine Room with a 5,000 bottle wine cellar and a seventh floor Poolside Café with commanding ocean views.

Discover a timeless jewel in Fort Lauderdale, renowned for its dazzling Atlantic Ocean, waterway, and cruise ship views. Set on 22 lush acres of tropical oasis along the intracoastal waterway, this breathtaking hotel provides the ideal getaway in the yachting capital of the world. Immerse yourself in boundless recreation or escape to a place of total relaxation at this resort-style retreat, which features exotic spa treatments and massages. Enjoy swaying palms and picturesque gardens along with spectacular food when you dine at any of the five restaurants and lounges. The hotel features complimentary beach shuttle, water taxi pick up, Avis rental car and is located adjacent to Port Everglades Cruise Port.