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Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America

Silversea Cruises
Dec 22, 2015 15 Days
Silver Wind 2536
US$6,450 per guest
Date: Day: Port: Arrive: Depart:
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
In the 1960s Fort Lauderdale's beachfront was lined with T-shirt shops interspersed with quickie-food outlets, and downtown consisted of a lone office tower, some dilapidated government buildings, and motley other structures waiting to be razed. Today the beach is home to upscale shops and restaurants, while downtown has exploded with new office and luxury residential development. The entertainment and shopping areas-Las Olas Boulevard, Las Olas Riverfront, and Himmarshee Village-are thriving. And Port Everglades is giving Miami a run for its money in passenger cruising, with a dozen cruise-ship terminals, including the world's largest, hosting more than 20 cruise ships with some 3,000 departures annually.
Pre-Post Cruise Hotel in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
Key West, Florida, United States of America
Along with the rest of Florida, Key West-the southernmost city in the continental United States-became part of American territory in 1821. In the late 19th century it was Florida's wealthiest city per capita. The locals made their fortunes from "wrecking"-rescuing people and salvaging cargo from ships that foundered on nearby reefs. Cigar making, fishing, shrimping, and sponge gathering also became important industries. Locally dubbed the "Conch Republic," Key West today makes for a unique port of call. A genuinely American town, it nevertheless exudes the relaxed atmosphere and pace of a typical Caribbean island.
San Juan, Puerto Rico
Although Puerto Rico is a commonwealth of the United States, few cities in the Caribbean are as steeped in Spanish tradition as San Juan. Within a seven-square-block area in Old San Juan are restored 16th-century buildings, museums, art galleries, bookstores, and 200-year-old houses with balustraded balconies overlooking narrow, cobblestone streets. In contrast, San Juan's sophisticated Condado and Isla Verde areas have glittering hotels, fancy boutiques, casinos, and discos. Out in the countryside is 28,000-acre El Yunque National Forest, a rain forest with more than 240 species of trees growing at least 100 feet high.
Gustavia, St Barts
Hilly St. Barthélemy, popularly known as St. Barth (or St. Barts) is just 8 square miles (21 square km), but the island has at least 20 good beaches. What draws visitors is its sophisticated but unstudied approach to relaxation: the finest food, excellent wine, high-end shopping, and lack of large-scale commercial development. A favorite among upscale cruise-ship passengers, who also appreciate the shopping opportunities and fine dining, St. Barth isn't really equipped for mega-ship visits, which is why most ships calling here are from smaller premium lines. This is one place where you don't need to take the ship's shore excursions to have a good time.
St. John's, Antigua and Barbuda
Some say Antigua has so many beaches that you could visit a different one every day for a year. Most have snow-white sand, and many are backed by lavish resorts that offer sailing, diving, windsurfing, and snorkeling. The largest of the British Leeward Islands, Antigua was the headquarters from which Lord Horatio Nelson (then a mere captain) made his forays against the French and pirates in the late 18th century. You may wish to explore English Harbour and its carefully restored Nelson's Dockyard, as well as tour old forts, historic churches, and tiny villages.
Castries, St Lucia, West Indies
Magnificent St. Lucia-with its towering mountains, dense rain forest, fertile green valleys, and acres of banana plantations-lies in the middle of the Windward Islands. Nicknamed "Helen of the West Indies" because of its natural beauty, St. Lucia is distinguished from its neighbors by its unusual geological landmarks, the Pitons-the twin peaks on the southwest coast that soar nearly ½ mile (1 km) above the ocean floor. Named a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 2004, the Pitons are the symbol of this island.
Bequia, St Vincent and Grenadines
Bequia (pronounced beck-way) is the Carib word for "island of the cloud." Part of St. Vincent and the Grenadines, hilly and green Bequia is 9 miles (14½ km) south of St. Vincent's southwestern shore and the largest and most populous of the 32 islands and cays that make up the Grenadines. The capital is Port Elizabeth, a tiny town with waterfront bars, restaurants, and shops where you can buy handmade souvenirs, including the exquisitely detailed model sailboats for which Bequia has become famous. Although boatbuilding, whaling, and fishing have been the predominant industries here for generations, sailing and Bequia have now become almost synonymous.
Bridgetown, Barbados
Barbadians (Bajans) are a warm, friendly, and hospitable people, who are genuinely proud of their country and culture. Although tourism is the island's number one industry, the island has a sophisticated business community and stable government, so life here doesn't skip a beat after passengers return to the ship. Barbados is the most "British" island in the Caribbean. Afternoon tea is a ritual, and cricket is the national sport. The atmosphere, though, is hardly stuffy. This is still the Caribbean, after all. Beaches along the island's south and west coasts are picture-perfect, and all are available to cruise passengers.
Bridgetown, Barbados
Barbadians (Bajans) are a warm, friendly, and hospitable people, who are genuinely proud of their country and culture. Although tourism is the island's number one industry, the island has a sophisticated business community and stable government, so life here doesn't skip a beat after passengers return to the ship. Barbados is the most "British" island in the Caribbean. Afternoon tea is a ritual, and cricket is the national sport. The atmosphere, though, is hardly stuffy. This is still the Caribbean, after all. Beaches along the island's south and west coasts are picture-perfect, and all are available to cruise passengers.
Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands
Once a sleepy backwater, Tortola is definitely busy these days, particularly when several cruise ships tie up at the Road Town dock. Passengers crowd the streets and shops, and open-air jitneys filled with cruise-ship passengers create bottlenecks on the island's byways. That said, most folks visit Tortola to relax on its deserted sands or linger over lunch at one of its many delightful restaurants. Beaches are never more than a few miles away, and the steep green hills that form Tortola's spine are fanned by gentle trade winds. The neighboring islands glimmer like emeralds in a sea of sapphire. Tortola doesn't have many historic sights, but it does have abundant natural beauty.
Samana, Dominican Republic
Picturesque Samaná Bay, on the northeastern coast of the Dominican Republic, is fringed with coconut palms and studded with islets. Inland are coconut-covered mountains, clear mountain streams and tropical rain forests. The area was first visited by Christopher Columbus in 1493, but he was so fiercely repelled by the Ciguayo Indians that he did not stay. The first inhabitants on the island, the Taino ribe, were descendants of the Awawakan Indians in the Amazonia. Located on the Samaná Peninsula, is the town of Santa Barbara de Samaná. The town was founded in 1756 by families brought from the Canary Islands expressly to colonize the area. The old town was destroyed by fire in 1946, leaving no evidence of its history.
Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands
Just 7 miles (11 km) long and a little over 1 mile (1½ km) wide, Grand Turk, the political capital of the Turks and Caicos Islands, has been a longtime favorite destination for divers eager to explore the 7,000-foot-deep pristine coral walls that drop down only 300 yards out to sea. On shore, the tiny, quiet island is home to white-sand beaches, the National Museum, and a small population of wild horses and donkeys, which leisurely meander past the white-walled courtyards, pretty churches, and bougainvillea-covered colonial inns on their daily commute into town. The main settlement on the island is tranquil Cockburn Town, and that's where most of the small hotels, not to mention Pillory Beach, can be found.
Grand Turk, Turks and Caicos Islands
Just 7 miles (11 km) long and a little over 1 mile (1½ km) wide, Grand Turk, the political capital of the Turks and Caicos Islands, has been a longtime favorite destination for divers eager to explore the 7,000-foot-deep pristine coral walls that drop down only 300 yards out to sea. On shore, the tiny, quiet island is home to white-sand beaches, the National Museum, and a small population of wild horses and donkeys, which leisurely meander past the white-walled courtyards, pretty churches, and bougainvillea-covered colonial inns on their daily commute into town. The main settlement on the island is tranquil Cockburn Town, and that's where most of the small hotels, not to mention Pillory Beach, can be found.
Fort Lauderdale, Florida, United States of America
In the 1960s Fort Lauderdale's beachfront was lined with T-shirt shops interspersed with quickie-food outlets, and downtown consisted of a lone office tower, some dilapidated government buildings, and motley other structures waiting to be razed. Today the beach is home to upscale shops and restaurants, while downtown has exploded with new office and luxury residential development. The entertainment and shopping areas-Las Olas Boulevard, Las Olas Riverfront, and Himmarshee Village-are thriving. And Port Everglades is giving Miami a run for its money in passenger cruising, with a dozen cruise-ship terminals, including the world's largest, hosting more than 20 cruise ships with some 3,000 departures annually.
Included in this cruise
  • Spacious suites – over 85% with private verandas
  • Personalised service – nearly one crew member for every guest
  • Butler service in every suite – all guests are pampered equally
  • Open-seating dining options – dine when and with whomever you please
  • Diversity of dining venues – casual, romantic, regional delicacies, and gourmet cuisine inspired by Relais & Châteaux
  • Beverages in-suite and throughout the ship – select wines, premium spirits, specialty coffees and soft drinks, plus your own tailored mini-bar
  • In-suite dining and 24-hour room service – always complimentary, always available
  • Sophisticated entertainment from live music to production shows
  • Enrichment lecturers and destination consultants
  • Complimentary transportation into town in most ports
  • Gratuities always included in your fare

Silver Wind,

Silversea Cruises
Al fresco dining with panoramic ocean views. Warm clubby spaces for evening cocktails with friends. The plush comfort of your ocean-view suite after a day of incredible sights. Welcome home to the luxury cruise ship, Silver Wind. Timelessly elegant yet luxuriously relaxed, Silver Cloud’s sleek sister ship strikes the perfect balance of yacht-like intimacy combined with the space, amenities and diversions typically reserved for larger vessels. Warm welcomes and gracious personalized service inspire our guests to call Silver Wind their “home away from home” - join us and discover the charms of Silver Wind.
ship
Key Facts
refurbished2013
crew222
guests  296
tonnage 17,400
length 514.14 Feet/156.7 Metres
width 70.62 Feet/21.5 Metres
speed 18 Knots
decks 6
built 1995
registry Bahamas
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Silversea Cruises Grande Hotel programme includes breakfast daily, hotel porterage, a private vehicle transfer between the hotel and airport, and a small group transfer between the hotel and pier.


The Ritz-Carlton, Fort Lauderdale infuses the Gold Coast with casual luxury as the city's first and only AAA Five Diamond hotel. Perched above the Atlantic Ocean and the Intracoastal Waterway, this beachfront hotel includes a 2,200 square foot Ritz-Carlton Club Lounge; a 29,000 square foot oceanfront sundeck with an infinity pool and private cabanas; full-service luxury spa with an organic and botanical treatment menu; and, a water-view fitness center.  Four dining and entertainment options include Via Luna Restaurant with seating indoors or al fresco on an oceanfront patio, the dramatic oceanfront Via Luna Bar, a private Wine Room with a 5,000 bottle wine cellar and a seventh floor Poolside Café with commanding ocean views.

Discover a timeless jewel in Fort Lauderdale, renowned for its dazzling Atlantic Ocean, waterway, and cruise ship views. Set on 22 lush acres of tropical oasis along the intracoastal waterway, this breathtaking hotel provides the ideal getaway in the yachting capital of the world. Immerse yourself in boundless recreation or escape to a place of total relaxation at this resort-style retreat, which features exotic spa treatments and massages. Enjoy swaying palms and picturesque gardens along with spectacular food when you dine at any of the five restaurants and lounges. The hotel features complimentary beach shuttle, water taxi pick up, Avis rental car and is located adjacent to Port Everglades Cruise Port.